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N1 Outdoors

N1 Outdoors is an outdoors company and outdoor apparel brand providing hunting and fishing tips via our blog and instructional videos. N1 shares bow hunting, fishing and other helpful information for those who hunt and fish and enjoy the outdoors. "Hunting, Fishing, The Outdoors... All N1"

The Year N Review 2018 | Relive The Unforgettable Moments

Relive some of the hunting, fishing and outdoor highlights of 2018 in this Year N Review special edition of the N1 Outdoors® N1 Minute™.

Join us as we take a look back at the unforgettable moments of 2018… stick with us for a special Year N Review in this N1 Outdoors N1 Minute….

2018 held some great N1 Moments for us here at N1 Outdoors…

From Hybrid fishing on Clark’s Hill Lake… to fly fishing in East Tennessee… we even noodled some catfish… I got to share in the joy of helping my business partner, Maston, find an archery buck he thought may never be found… And my other business partner, Josh, shared his secret deer mineral recipe with all of you.

We got to work with the phenomenally talented wildlife artist, Daniel Cliburn, on a new deer hunting shirt design… and we also got to talk shop with a world record holder.

But, more than that, we got to share in your N1 Moments as well.

And that’s what makes moments outdoors so special… sharing them with friends and family.

Thank you to those who read and watch our content and purchase and wear our apparel. We hope you have a Merry Christmas as we celebrate the birth of our Savior, and a Happy New year. We hope 2019 is your best yet, and remember… where the moments happen…. we’ll meet you there… we’ll see you next year.

deer mineral recipe pic

Grow Bigger Bucks | How To Make Your Own Deer Mineral Lick

Who doesn’t want to see bigger bucks during deer season? Do you wish you could see greater antler growth in your deer herd, but just aren’t sure what to do to make it happen?

There are countless mineral supplements for sale these days… mineral blocks, mineral rocks and minerals in powder form. But you don’t have to go buy minerals with fancy labels and pictures of big antlers on the packaging. You can make your own deer minerals and we’ll show you how!

We want to help you learn how to make your own deer mineral recipe, so that you can not only make a product that will help you have a healthier deer herd, but be able to do it without breaking the bank.

WANT TO LEARN HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN DEER MINERAL RECIPE? SCROLL DOWN TO WATCH VIDEO!

Minerals: A Recipe For Deer Success

Of course, larger antler size gets most hunters giddy. But bucks aren’t the only ones that need mineral supplements. Does need it just as much.

When the does are pregnant, start to produce milk and lactate for the fawns that will be born, they need extra calcium. This will help with lactation, but it also is essential for a healthy bone structure of the fawn that is growing in the womb. 

Kentucky Buck John Workman Picture
Minerals play an important role in whitetail antler size as well as the overall health of your deer herd, both male and female.

Bucks also need the extra calcium boost, as they will use around 40 percent of the calcium in their own bone structure to grow antlers.

The antler growth process happens every year and calcium plays a huge part.

This means that a buck needs not only a good food supply during the antler growing process, but it also needs calcium during the growth process in the mother’s womb. A healthy bone structure will contribute to greater antler growth later in the deer’s life.

Consistent, healthy antler growth requires consistent nutrition… Keep reading to find out how to get started making your own deer mineral lick!

Diligence Is Key

Supplementing your deer herd with the proper nutrition and minerals needed to promote good antler growth is not something you can do just once. So, if you’re hoping to just visit your local outdoors store, buy a mineral block, put it out and hope to see and kill big deer, you may want to temper those expectations.

If you want a deer herd that consistently produces bucks with good antler size, you have to be consistent yourself as well.

Start making your own deer mineral supplements today and do so every year, so that you can reap the benefits for years to come.

You’ll find in the video below, that all the ingredients you will need to begin making your own deer mineral sites can be found at your local farm or feed store.

We hope you enjoy learning how to create your own minerals for your deer herd! (Note: Be sure to check and follow your state’s laws on use of attractants and supplements on private as well as public hunting land.

The N1 Outdoors N1 Minute: How To Make Your Own Deer Mineral Licks

In this edition of the N1 Outdoors N1 Minute, learn how to make your own mineral licks for deer. We show you a simple deer mineral recipe that you can make. We also give you some tips on where to place it. If you want to improve the overall health of your deer herd, then this is one of our must-see hunting videos. We give you the deer mineral recipe for whitetail success!

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Deer Mineral Recipe Ingredients:

  • 2 parts trace minerals
  • 1 part mixing salt
  • 1 part dried molasses
  • 1 part dicalcium phosphate

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(How To Make Your Own Deer Mineral Licks video transcript)

Want to learn how to make your own mineral licks for your deer herd? We’ll show you how. Stick with us for the N1 Outdoors N1 Minute.

Today we hear from N1 Outdoors co-founder, Josh Wells, who gives us a recipe for success in having a healthy deer herd.

Hey, Josh Wells here with the N1 Outdoors N1 tip. We’re gonna make mineral licks today and what we’ve got here that we’re using for the minerals is trace minerals… we are putting two parts trace minerals, one part mixing salt, one part dried molasses and one part dicalcium phosphate.

Why the mineral nutrition is important for deer

What this is going to do for our herd is give the does that are now impregnated, more or less a prenatal vitamin. It’s going to give them what will be equivalent to our multi-vitamins. As the bucks are shedding their horns, they’re automatically starting to grow them back right now. It’s going to help increase their potential of growing big horns.

Where to put the mineral lick

There is a major trail on this side and a major trail on that side of this mineral lick. Now, you don’t want to necessarily put it in the middle of a trail. Put it close to nearby trails and they will find it. They’re not going to eat this like they would a feed or a protein feed or corn. They will come and use this as their body craves the mineral.

As you can see, just last night, there are some tracks in this mineral. So, they have already found it. That is because of the dried molasses.

The dried molasses has a strong, sweet, cane smell, and that is why they’ve already found this. We will check back on this in about two months and see how it’s going, and my supplement this mineral with some more material.

Thanks again for joining us for this edition of the N1 Outdoors N1 Minute. Be sure to visit N1outdoors.com, where you can read all about unforgettable moments outdoors. Also, connect with us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

We hope you have a great week, and remember, “where the moment happen, we’ll meet you there.” We’ll see you next time.

N1 Outdoors – How To Make Your Own Deer Mineral Recipe:

  1. Trace Minerals

    2 parts trace minerals.

  2. Mixing Salt

    Mix the above with 1 part mixing salt.

  3. Dried Molasses

    Mix the above with 1 part dried molasses.

  4. Dicalcium Phosphate

    Mix the above with 1 part dicalcium phosphate.

black crappie flyrod picture

Black Crappie And White Crappie | Know The Difference

Whether you are a master at crappie fishing or just catch the occasional white or black crappie, they are exciting fish to catch as well as to eat.

But have you ever wondered how to tell the difference between the different species of crappie?

There are seven different species of crappie:

  • Triploid (Magnolia) crappie
  • Gold crappie
  • Stock hybrid crappie
  • Natural hybrid crappie
  • Black-nosed crappie
  • White crappie
  • Black crappie

The two types of crappie we will focus on in this article are black crappie and white crappie.

Basic Crappie Info

Before we explore the differences between white and black crappie, let’s take a look at some basic information about crappie.

Crappie are freshwater fish and are part of the sunfish family. They can be found in various waters in the US and Canada.

Crappie have a sustainable population due to the equilibrium that exists between their reproduction rate and the rate at which they are harvested each year.

Crappies love to eat smaller fish that exist in their habitat. When fishing for crappie, you can use a wide variety of baits, including minnows and jigs.

Although crappies can be found in smaller schools by anglers, they are typically known to move in large schools. 

Black and white crappie are similar in many ways, but there are some key differences that will help you differentiate between the two species.

Black Crappie

Black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) are found in fresh waters, mostly in North America. They are typically found in bodies of water with very low current, where they hide under timber, thick weeds and other vegetation. When fully grown, it’s not uncommon for black crappie reach weights of two pounds. 

Here are some other interesting black crappies specs:

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Black crappie have a distinguishing darker pattern than white crappie.

Black Crappie Size

Black crappies that are caught will typically measure in length from 4 to 10 inches, but can get much larger. The current record for the longest black crappie is just over 19 inches. an be anywhere from about five inches to over 19 inches. 

Weight

Black crappies typically weigh ¼ lb to about ½ lb but they are also known to reach up to 4 lbs.

Food

Black crappies are known to feed in the early hours of the morning. They also feed during the midnight till about 2 am. They often feed on insects and crustaceans and larger black crappie will feed on other fish such as minnows and shad. 

Reproduction

Black crappies are renowned for their fast reproduction rates. Therefore, after each spawning season, black crappie population increases significantly in lakes and small ponds.

Female black crappie are known to produce at least 11,000 eggs and can produce in excess of 180,000 eggs. As soon is spawning is over, the male black crappies secure the nest for about two to three days until they hatch.

Habitat

Black crappies live in lakes, water reservoirs, and large rivers. They love to reside in low-velocity areas with clean water and love to have an abundant cover like vegetation. They also love sand bottoms which are located in freshwater bodies.

Life Expectancy

Black crappie mature at an age of two to four years, but the typical life span lasts about seven years. 

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White Crappie

Like the black crappie, white crappie (pomoxis annularis) are typically found in various freshwater bodies in North America. White crappie are also similar to the black crappie in terms of weight but tend to be slightly longer than black crappie. White crappie tend to be found in large schools and often hide under rocks or in areas of heavy vegetation. 

White crappies are known to attain maturity within 24 months and some reports reveal that they can survive for about six years on the average.

Here are some white crappie specs that might interest you:

white crappie picture
White crappie have a lighter color than the black crappie.

White Crappie Size

Mature white crappies typically measure in length from 9 to 15 inches. 

Weight

White crappies basically weigh ¼ lb to about ½ lb, however, according to the IGFA, the all-tackle world record white crappie is 5 lbs. 3 oz. 

Food

Juvenile white crappie feed on zooplankton and insects, but once they mature, will often feed on smaller fish, such as minnows, as well as crayfish.  

Reproduction

Spawning for white crappies occurs in the months of May and June at a water temperature of 56°F. Female white crappies can produce from around 5,000 eggs to over 90,000. Male crappies keep the nest secure by guarding it. 

Life expectancy

White crappie can live for up to nine years.

Habitat

You will mostly find white crappies in large rivers, water reservoirs, and lakes. White crappies have a very high tolerance for murky waters and can be spotted in areas which have low velocity like pools and also river backwaters. During the morning hours and in the evenings, white crappies are usually located in the open water. However, during the day, white crappies prefer to stay in waters that are quieter, shallower, with surrounding structure.

Black Crappie Vs. White Crappie (The Differences)

Now that we’ve covered some basics about both black and white crappie, let’s look at some ways that they differ.

white crappie dorsal fin spines
White crappie have 5-6 spines on the dorsal fin, whereas black crappie have 7-8.

Coloration:

Coloration is the most obvious difference between black and white crappie. Black crappie have a darker look while the white crappie appear lighter in color and this is the reason why they have those names. However, while many think that the “white” and “black” refer only to their appearance, it more specifically refers to the markings of each fish. 

Body Markings Of White Crappie And Black Crappie

The body markings on white crappie and black crappie differ. White crappie have vertical “bars” and have brighter stripes running directly from their upper body down to their lower body. However, black crappie have much darker body markings that do not adopt a precise pattern on its sides. The black crappie’s black markings appear to be more random, or speckled.

Length

What seems like a difference in length between black and white crappie is often more about shape. Black crappie typically have a more compact, rounder and flatter body while white crappie are more elongated. 

Dorsal Fins

The dorsal fins are a major determining factor. If you look closely, a white crappie typically have 5-6 spines on their dorsal fin, while a black crappie will have 7-8. 

Fin Position

The position of the dorsal fins from the head of white crappies is somewhat farther away, while in the black crappies, the dorsal fins are positioned nearer to the head of the fish.

crappie with damaged dorsal fin
Crappie themselves are predators, but they are also preyed upon. This picture shows a black crappie with what was probably an attempt by a blue heron or eagle to snatch it out of the water.

Habitat Preferences

Many experienced crappie anglers will say that there is a higher possibility of finding white crappies hidden in bodies of water that contain a large number of rocks or thick vegetation, while black crappies seem to prefer clearer water containing sand beds.

Mouth Structure

White crappie have a larger mouth than black crappie. Another difference in mouth structure is that the mouths of black crappie turn more upward than white crappie.

In Conclusion:

While any kind of crappie is both fun to catch and also delicious, we hope this article has provided you with some helpful information on how to tell the difference between them. Whether your crappie fishing adventures find you chasing white crappie or black crappie, we hope you get to put a hook N1 and have a “crappie” day!

Be sure to check out our N1 Outdoors® fishing and hunting apparel!

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