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Thoughts on broadheads from N1

Online reviews can sometimes have an agenda of pushing a particular product. We thought it would be fun to give some straight talk from the N1 Outdoors co-founders on the broadheads they have used over the years.

Below, Josh Wells, Maston Boyd and Giles Canter give their thoughts on what they like and don’t like about some of the broadheads they have experience with during their archery hunts.

N1 Outdoors co-founder, Josh Wells

I started bowhunting in 1996. I was 16 years old and began bowhunting with the broadhead recommended by a friend. It was the Muzzy 3 blade in 100 grains…

Muzzy 3-blade broadheads, 100 grain

I harvested my first archery deer, in addition to several other deer with the Muzzy 3-blades. On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate this one at 7.

My experience with the Muzzy 3-blade is as follows:

Pros

The Muzzy 3-blade broadheads have a simple design. They are durable and easy to assemble, as well as affordable to buy. They also create decent blood trails.

Cons

In my experience, the Muzzy 3-blade broadheads have inconsistent and unstable arrow flight. By that, I mean that they fly differently than field points and requires advanced bow tuning skills.

Thunderhead 3-blade, 100 grain

After several years of using Muzzy 3-blade, I decided to change to something that was more consistent in flight. My choice was the Thunderhead 3-blade in 100 grains.

I harvested several deer with these, as well as my first turkey. On as scale of 1 to 10, I would rate these broadheads at 7.5.

My experience with the Thunderhead 3-blade is as follows:

They are very similar to the Muzzy 3-blade with the only real difference being that they are slightly more consistent and stable during flight.

Pros

These broadheads have a simple design and are affordable. They are durable, easy to assemble, and leave decent blood trails.

Cons

While the Thunderhead 3-blade broadheads have positive qualities similar to the Muzzy 3-blade, they also share some of the negatives as well. The negatives are inconsistent and unstable arrow flight. They do not fly like field points and require advanced tuning skills as well. 

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Grim Reaper 3-blade, 100 grain

Sometime along the way, I decided to try mechanical broadheads, due to the reviews that I had been reading regarding massive blood trails, and arrow flight that was consistent with field points.

The broadhead that I chose was the Grim Reaper 3-blade in 100 grains with a 1-3/8” cutting diameter. This is the only mechanical broadhead that I’ve ever used.

I was pleased with the results that I got from these broadheads, but I eventually made my way back to fixed blades due to a lack of confidence in the mechanical heads functioning properly 100% of the time. However, I harvested more than 10 deer with these broadheads over several hunting seasons.

On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate this head at 8.5. My experience with the Grim Reaper broadheads is as follows:

Pros

I found that the Grim Reaper broadheads had arrow flight consistent with field points. I also found them to be durable, with blades that were easily replaceable. As advertised, I experienced massive blood trails. They were one of the more affordable mechanical heads, with each package containing a practice point.

Cons

The Grim Reaper broadheads require attention to detail during assembly in order to make sure blades engage properly on impact. This can decrease hunters’ confidence in knowing that it’s possible that the blades won’t engage properly. (I will note that this never actually happened to me, but I’ve heard several other bow hunters say that it did in fact happen to them.

Magnus 2-blade, 100 grain

Eventually, I decided to go back to fixed blade broadheads. When I did my choice was influenced by the simple fact that shot placement is the most important factor in determining an archer’s successful recovery of an animal.

So, I was determined to find the most accurate broadhead available. I settled on the Magnus 2-blade in 100 grains.

I harvested more than 10 deer with these heads over several seasons. My major reason for changing away from this broadhead was because of consistently poor blood trails.

On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate this head at 6. My experience with the Magnus 2-blade broadheads is as follows:

Pros

The Magnus 2-blade broadheads are super accurate, flying very similar to field points (although tuning is key in this area). They also had very good penetration, were easy to sharpen, and were the most affordable broadheads I’ve ever used.

Cons:

These heads were not very durable (the tips tended to bend easily). They also produced very bad blood trails (several deer I harvested left no blood trail at all).

Ramcat 3-blade, 100 grain

The next broadheads that I used were the Ramcat 3-blade in 100 grains. These broadheads were recommended by a friend that kills a lot of nice deer. I wasn’t crazy about the design of the blades (the screws loosen on impact for two-way cutting), but I decided to give them a shot.

I harvested three deer with these before I decided they weren’t for me. While they are very good broadheads from what I can tell, I couldn’t get past the blades loosening on impact (and sometimes in my quiver).

On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate these at 8. My experience with these broadheads is as follows:

Pros

They were very accurate, flying very similar to field points. They’re durable, with the blades possessing two-side cutting action. They are affordable and for fixed blade broadheads, produce decent blood trails.

Cons

The blades on these heads tend to loosen in the quiver.

Magnus Stinger Buzzcut

The last broadhead that I’ve used (which is the broadhead that I currently use and don’t plan on changing) is the Magnus Stinger Buzzcut in 100 grains.

I’ve used these broadheads now for about five seasons. I’ve harvested more than 10 deer with them.

I am equally satisfied with the Magnus Corporation’s customer service as I am with this broadhead. The Stinger Buzzcuts are on the high end of pricing for fixed blades, but the cost is offset by Magnus’ lifetime warranty, which I have firsthand experience with. I received a package of new broadheads this past season at no cost when they replaced broadheads that had either chips, or were slightly bent due to contact with bone.

magnus stinger buzzcut broadhead

On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate this broadhead at 9. My experience is as follows:

Pros

These heads are super accurate, flying very similar to field points. They get very good penetration, are easy to sharpen, and produce good blood trails for a fixed blade broadhead.

Cons

So far, I have found none. The only reason that I didn’t give this broadhead a rating of 10 is because I haven’t used every broadhead out there, and couldn’t be certain that it’s the best one on the market. I just know it’s the best broadhead that I’ve ever used.

N1 Outdoors co-founder, Maston Boyd

I have tried several broadheads over the years and am always willing to try something new to compare with my experiences with other models.

Swhacker broadheads, 2-blade, 100 grain

I have found that Swhackers fly true. I have had many a bowhunt with great experiences and performance from these.

G5 Montec, 3-blade, 100 grain

In my opinion these are good, all-around broadheads for bowhunting. My only complaint would be that they don’t leave the biggest hole.

Magnus 2-blade, 100 grain

Like Josh, I too have used the Magnus 2-blade in 100 grain. I experienced good flight and feel that they are a good blade for pass-through shots. However, there is not always a lot of blood, which can obviously be problematic in tracking the animal.

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Muzzy 3-blade, 100 grain

I never got great flight patterns with the Muzzy 3-blade. Plain and simple.

Wasp 3-blade, 100 grain

I experienced the same problems of flight pattern with these that I did with the Muzzy 3-blade.

Thunderhead 3-blade, 125 grain

I experienced good flight as well as good performance on game with these broadheads. 

Tshuttle 3-blade, 100 grain

Good flight and good blood. ‘Nuff said.

Rage 3-blade, 100 grain

The 3-blade Rage broadheads, in my experience, provided good flight. However, they were inconsistent on game and left me hoping that I didn’t hit bone.

Grim Reaper 3-blade, 100 grain

I only shot one deer with these. No pass through and no deer. Need I say more? Mechanical madness!

N1 Outdoors co-founder, Giles Canter

I killed my first archery deer in 2000. Over the years I have not been one to chase the latest, greatest, or most heavily advertised broadhead or archery equipment.

Simply put, I like to know what to expect in the field. In my opinion, the worst time to shoot a new broadhead for the first time is when there is meat on the line.

I like to know the positives, as well as the limitations, of the broadheads and archery gear that I use, so that I know what to expect when the moment of truth comes. Because of this, I tend to stick with things for awhile unless I have a good reason to change. If it ain’t broke…

With that being said, I have used a handful of broadheads over the years and here are my thoughts…

Thunderhead 3-blade, 125 grain

These are near and dear to me since I took my first archery deer with a Thunderhead 3-blade. They give good flight and performance. A simple and solid broadhead, in my opinion.

Muzzy 3-blade, 100 grain

I used the Muzzy 3-blade for several seasons and killed many deer with them. But, I eventually set them aside because I didn’t feel like the groupings and arrow flight at all consistent with field points shot with the same setup. Call me picky, but I wasn’t crazy about the angled, overlapping blade assembly either. 

Muzzy MX-3, 100 grain

I like the Muzzy MX-3 broadheads. They have pretty tough blades that can be sharpened or replaced. I have used the same blades for multiple kills on more than a few occasions. In my opinion these fly a little truer than the Muzzy 3-blade, but still don’t group great.

Grim Reaper 3-blade, 100 grain

I tried these broadheads (2-inch cut) for a couple hunting seasons at the recommendation of a friend whose initials are Josh Wells! While I killed several deer and experienced some devastatingly bloody trails with them, I also experienced some deflections as well. These left me feeling, well, grim!

I also once shot a turkey center-breast with the Grim Reaper that flew off with my arrow hanging out of it. This left me feeling grim again! I don’t like feeling grim, so I retired from using Grim Reapers.

G5 Striker

I started using the G5 Strikers by accident. My wife asked me what I wanted for Christmas. I am usually incapable of thinking of gift ideas that aren’t hunting related. So, I said, “how ’bout some Swhacker broadheads?”

When I opened my Christmas gifts that year, there was a brand new pack of… Striker broadheads! She said, “those are the right ones aren’t they?” I said, “well, I was looking for Swhackers, but these look great!”

I have actually thoroughly enjoyed using the G5 Strikers. They have proven to be very accurate for me and I have taken several deer with them. The only downside is that they don’t always leave the best blood trail. 

Swhacker broadheads, 100 grain

Well, I did finally get my Swhackers (2-inch cut) that I referenced above! I have been as pleased with them as much as I have the Strikers. Arrow flight is great and pretty much like a field point. In my experience, they have left devastating wound channels and great blood trails.

The only thing I haven’t liked so far is that the blades can, especially with more than one use, begin to rattle somewhat during the draw. I am particular about being as silent as possible during a bow hunt. Because of this, I would view this as a negative. However, you have to buy new ones some time, I suppose!

Also be sure to check out our N1 whitetail deer hunting tips

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