How To Tie The Uni-Knot or Hangman’s knot [You can do it!]

How To Tie The Uni Knot

The Uni-knot is a very versatile and strong fishing knot. This knot is great for many fishing scenarios. You can use it for line to leader combinations as well.

Step-by-step instructions are below. But first, this diagram may help!

How to tie the uni knot for fishing illustration
The Uni Knot in 60 seconds!

More step-by-step uni knot instructions below!





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The Uni Knot [Hangmans Knot] | Step-By-Step Instructions

Check out these step-by-step instructions below to learn how to tie the Uni-Knot!

Time needed: 1 minute.

Instructions for how to tie the Uni Knot

  1. Thread line through eye of hook or lure.

    threading eye of uni knot hook

  2. Grab the “tag end” of the line (the end NOT connected to your spool).

    grabbing tag end of uni knot

  3. Make a loop with the tag end of the line.

    looping tag end of uni knot

  4. Pinch the top of the loop you just made against the line with your index finger.

    holding uni knot loop end against line

  5. Loop the tag end of the line inside and around the top of the loop 5 times.

    loop the tag end 5 times

  6. Slowly pull the tag end away from the hook/lure.

    pulling tag end of uni knot

  7. Trim the tag end of the line. FINISHED! You have completed the Uni-Knot!

    trimming tag end of uni knot


We know many of you enjoy learning how to tie different types of fishing knots. You may have watched some of our other videos on how to tie the palomar knot, or double palomar knot. Check out the video below on how to tie the one of the most versatile fishing knots… The Uni Knot!





So, grab a rod, tie on your favorite fishing lure with a uni knot, and Put A Hook N1!

Be sure to check our Put A Hook N1 fishing shirt designs!

sevr 1.5 and 1.7 inch broadheads

Sevr Broadheads Review | What You Need To Know

-By John Lusk

In this broadhead review, I tested broadheads from SEVR; The SEVR 1.5, 1.7, 2.1 and Ti 2.0.

SEVR Broadhead Offerings

SEVR originally came out with a broadhead that had a 2.1” cutting diameter. It was a great head with fantastic flight and it was tough. But, the penetration is about what you would expect from a 2.1” broadhead and it was a bit lacking in kinetic energy for my purposes.  

For a deer, or even for smaller game like turkey, if your number one goal is a big hole, the 2.1” SEVR is going to deliver. But to round out their lineup, they’ve come up with two additional offerings.

sevr broadheads 15. and 1.7 inch diagram
The 1.5-inch and 1.7-inch SEVR broadheads look the same in shape, but with some subtle differences in head and ferrule composition.

SEVR 1.7-inch Broadhead

To compliment their original broadhead, SEVR introduced a 1.7” head. It has a stainless steel tip and it has got a good grade aluminum ferrule. It has rear deploying blades that lock in place, which I love.

The 1.7” cutting diameter provides decent penetration and is a good all-around broadhead offering for pretty much any kind of game.

SEVR 1.5-inch Broadhead

SEVR also introduced the 1.5-inch head. The 1.5-inch operates just like the 2.1-inch with a few design differences.

On the 1.7-inch head, the tip is not quite as big as the 1.5-inch head and also has a smaller ferrule.  The 1.7-inch head only comes in a 100-grain and is a little cheaper, while the 1.5-inch head comes in a 100-grain as well as a 125-grain.

SEVR 1.5-inch and 1.7-inch heads | The details…

Firstly, just as the name implies, the 1.5-inch head has a 1.5-inch cutting diameter. Also, the ferrule and tip on the 1.5-inch head are titanium, as opposed to the stainless steel tip and aluminum ferrule of its 2.1-inch predecessor.

The blades of the 1.5-inch head are stainless steel and lock into place just like the 2.1-inch head.



The 1.5-inch head is designed for big-bodied, heavy-skinned animals. It is also better for longer distance shots, due to the smaller cutting diameter.

Although the cut is 1.5” wide, the chiseled tip itself is approximately 5/16-inch wide. So, with the 1.5-inch width cut in one direction and the 5/16-inch wide tip cut in the other direction, you get a total of a little over 1-3/4 inches of cut with a 1-1/2-inch hole.  


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Pricing

SEVR has a direct-to consumer approach, so you can only order them from their website. You can purchase them by the eaches, but you can get a better deal if you buy higher quantities.

At the time of this article’s publishing, the 1.7-heads are $11.99 each. The 1.5-inch head is $13.99. The 1.5 is more expensive due to the titanium head. You can purchase at SEVRbroadheads.com

Using code LUSKFIVE will give you $5 off any order at SEVRbroadheads.com!

Blades and cutting features

I love the way the SEVRs work. They have two small “wings” that are exposed during flight. When they come in contact with an animal, they actually “pre-stretch” the hide (skin) as the blades deploy. In theory, since the blades are rear-deploying, not only do you get a 4-cut entry, but you get a bigger cut.  



>>Hunting & Fishing Shirts with a story

The heads of the SEVRs also lock into place. So, unlike a lot of mechanical heads that can close down if there’s not a certain amount of pressure, these heads lock in place and they stay that way in the animal.

Because they lock in place, they will not give a smaller cut than they do at their full deployment. The blades will go back into pre-deployment position when removing from the animal, but will still lock back down in deployment position.



If you’ve ever shot a broadhead into a deer or other animal and hit bone, it typically deflects off course. But, the great thing about the SEVRs is that the will rotate to one side if they come they come into contact with bone or a hard medium like a rib.

The blade will simply fall to the side that encounters the bone, allowing the other blade to continue cutting and still keeps the broadhead on track.

sevr blade rotation

SEVR blades will rotate when coming in contact with bone or other hard surfaces, which helps prevent bending and breaking of blades and keeps heads on course.

This feature helps increase the chances of getting a good exit and getting better penetration of lungs and other vitals when the head encounters bone. And, because the blades stay locked even as they rotate, they just “dance” around the bone.

Another nice feature to the SEVR broadheads is that when there is heavy pressure on the blades – the type of pressure that might bend or break both blades – they compressed ever so slightly to absorb some of that impact. Because of this feature, they are difficult to break.




Blade Thickness

The 1.7-inch heads have a blade thickness of 0.035-inch thick. The 1.5-inch heads have blades that are 0.032-inch thick. Both heads have all the same features, locking in place and pivoting around bone, staying on track.

I was excited that they came out with a 1.7 and came out with a 1.5 because the 2.1-inch was just a little bit much for me to be able to be confident that I would be able to get a pass-through on an animal.

Although I knew I would get a big hole, I needed to be confident that I would get pass throughs. And, when hunting large animals like elk or bear, I want to be sure I get deep penetration.  



Blade angle and overall cut

Another thing I like about the 1.5-inch head versus the original 2.1-inch head is that the blade angle is much less. So, penetration is not only better because of a smaller cutting area, but it’s also better because of the smaller angle.

The same with the 1.7-inch head. While it has a slightly larger cutting angle than the 1.5, it is still less than the 2.1. So, the 1.7 also gets better penetration, not only because of the angle, but because of the smaller diameter cut.  



Now, you might think, “Oh, 1.5 or 1.7 inches is kind of small.” But, there are not many fixed heads that have a 1.5-inch cut. They might have a combined 2-inch cut, with 1-inch one way and 1-inch the other way.

But, what I have found with broadheads on game animals is that the wider a cut, the more effective bloodletting you will get.



On three and four-blade broadheads, although you may get more total tissue cut, you get a smaller cutting diameter. And, smaller holes tend to get plugged up easier with organs blood and tissue, resulting in less effective blood trails.

But, when you get a wider cut, even like a 1.5-inch, the hide and wound tend to stretch open as the animal moves, producing better bloodletting.



Of course, with the 1.7, you would get even more.

With the 2.1-inch head, you’re going to get a lot of bloodletting, but you are going to compromise penetration to do so.  

So, with the new SEVR lineup, you have something for everyone. But, what I really wanted to see was… how do they fly? They are really the same heads, so I just tested the 1.5-inch.  



SEVR flight

sevr broadhead in target

The SEVRs fly just like a field point, providing great accuracy, even at long distances.

When it comes to target shooting the SEVR heads, there is a feature that helps them stand out. Each head comes with a small set screw, so that when you shoot, the head stays in a closed position.

Because the blades do not deploy, they don’t touch the target at all. It’s very nice on your target and on the head itself.

So, in essence it makes the actual broadhead a practice head, and is easy to pull out of the target. Just be sure that when you hunt, you have removed the set screw, or the blades will not deploy.



Penetration and durability testing

For my penetration and durability tests, I shot the SEVR heads through 1-2-inch layers of MDF, with a foam mat in the front. I also shot them at a 45-degree angle on the MDF. After those tests, I shot them into a steel plate.

For testing, I shot the Bowtech SR6, set at 72 pounds, on the comfort setting. The arrows I used with the heads are the Bishop Mammoth FOC King, bsecause they are the most durable arrows made. These tests really put the arrows through the ringer and yet they don’t get damaged, as they are incredibly resilient.



MDF Board Penetration Test

I shot the 1.5-inch, 125-grain head and the 1.7-inch, 100-grain head into the MDF. Both broadheads penetrated all the way through the first board and then stopped into the second board.

In the back of the second layer of MDF, the 1.7-inch bulged out a little bit. The 1.5-inch bulged out quite a bit more.

On the entrance hole, both deployed upon impact even with the soft pad over the first board and the cuts are exactly as advertised.

The 1.5-inch head opened up to 1.5 inches. And the 1.7-inch head opened up to 1.7 inches exactly.

45-degree angle shot into MDF

I set up two MDF boards at a 45-degree angle and shot both the 1.5 and 1.7-inch heads into it.   

Both heads penetrated precisely straight through. There was no sliding off the 45-degree angle board at all. And, the penetration was great for both of them. You see the top one was the 1.5-inch, the bottom the 1.7.

entrance holes of 1.5 and 1.7 inch sevr broadheads
Both the 1.5 and 1.7-inch SEVR heads created their respective sized entrance holes in the foam pad and MDF board.
penetration test of 1.5 and 1.7 inch sevr broadheads
Both heads penetrated into the second layer of MDF board.
1.5 and 1.7 sevrs penetrating 45-degree angled mdf
The 1.5-inch SEVR penetrated slightly better through 45-degree angled MDF board.


Steel Plate Penetration Test

Because these heads held up so well in the MDF testing, I also shot them into a steel plate to evaluate what would happen.  

I honestly wasn’t expecting them to hold up that well after all those other MDF board shots. But, they went through the steel plate and then through the second board.

You can see that the 1.5-inch at the top, blew all the way through it. And you can see the tip of the 1.7-inch, 100-grain, sticking at the bottom.



Here are the heads after going through the initial two layers of MDF and then another layer of MDF and an angle, and then a layer of steel plate and then another MDF, half inch MDF.

All of them were half inch MDFs. And they both held up extremely well.

On the 1.5-inch, there was zero damage to the tip. The blades took very little damage, incurring only one nick. (The nick at the bottom is part of the design that holds the rubber bands in place.)

As for the 1.7-inch, they too held up really well, receiving small nicks both blades from the steel plate test.

Overall, the SEVR heads held up really well, including the blades, tips and ferrules.  

sevr steel plate penetration
Both the 1.5 and the 1.7-inch SEVR heads penetrated the steel plate and the first layer of MDF.

BONUS: SEVR 2.0 Ti Broadheads Review

Below I’m going to show you the results of my testing of the SEVR Ti 2.0, but first, a little history behind this head…

How the Ti 2.0 came to be

SEVR originally came out with their first broadhead, called the 2.1, which was just known as the SEVR. It had a massive 2.1 cutting diameter, and some really cool features (blades pivoting around bone and a super low profile in flight, titanium ferrule, etc.)

There was a lot I liked about that head and I did some initial testing on it when it first came out.

The only drawback that I saw in that head was that it wasn’t the best at penetration. Now, with a full 2.1-inch cut, you don’t expect it to penetrate super well, but I thought it should penetrate a bit better than it did.



So since that time, SEVR came out with the 1.7 and the 1.5, which I’ve covered above. They shortened the cut a little bit in the 1.7, and 1.5 (1.7 inches and 1.5 inches instead of 2.1).

I’ve since come to love those heads. In fact, the 1.5 is one of my very favorite heads, period. It’s more durable than most fixed-blade heads and by far the most durable mechanical that I’ve ever tested. I’ve taken animals with it all over the world.

Well now, they’ve come out with another big cut model that is also supposed to maximize penetration. And that is this Ti, (Titanium) 2.0.



The SEVR Ti 2.0 compared to the old SEVR 2.1

I tested the SEVR Ti 2.0 for penetration, for edge sharpness and retention, and for durability.

I didn’t test the flight because I’ve already tested the flight of the SEVRs quite a bit and they fly exceptionally well. You can see the low profile. They just fly like a field point.

But I put it through all those other tests and I want to compare the 2.1 to the new 2.0 and see what the difference is in terms of penetration.



The SEVRs have a solid titanium ferrule that is grade 5 titanium and one piece all the way up, including the tip.

The blades are made out of a hardened 420 stainless steel at 0.032 inches thick. The blades are held in place by a little O-ring at the base that fits into that groove and when they’re shot and penetrate into the hide when they first made contact, the winged tips pushed the blades back and they deploy and lock into an open position, giving a full  cutting diameter (in this case, 2.1 inches).

sevr ti 2.0 and 2.1 differences
Here, you can see the differences between the old SEVR 2.1 and the newer SEVR Ti 2.0.

These two heads may look similar, but there are three main differences.

  • The new Ti 2.0 has a slightly smaller cut, 2.0 inches versus 2.1 on the original SEVR.
  • The blades of the Ti 2.0 have a more swept angle (less straightness) to them, so they’re going to get easier penetration.
  • The little winged tips that caused the deployment of the 2.1, they protrude a little bit farther beyond the blade than they do on the 2.0. On the 2.0, they just slightly protrude, and that increases penetration.

So, those three changes and modifications from the 2.1 to the 2.0 are supposed to result in up to 15% deeper penetration by and large. So I was eager that to the test.

SEVR Ti 2.0 sharpness test

The SEVR Ti 2.0 was still able to cut paper cuts paper after five strokes of the shaft of a carbon arrow.

sevr ti 2.0 cutting paper test
The Ti 2.0 was able to cut paper after 5 strokes of the arrow.


Ballistic Gel Penetration test comparison

I shot both the 2.1 and the Ti 2.0 into ballistic gel that was fronted by a rubber mat and 1/2″ MDF.

sevr ti 2.0 and 2.1 penetration into ballistic gel
The 2.1 penetrated 6 and 3/4 inches and the new SEVR Ti 2.0 penetrated 7 and 3/4 inches.

Ti 2.0 MDF durability test

I shot the Ti 2.0 into MDF to see how it would hold up. The results were surprising.

sevr 2.0 ti after mdf penetration test
Here’s the head after going through the MDF five times. And as you can see, it looks brand new.

Then, I decided to see how it would handle a .22 gauge steel plate.

sevr ti 2.0 after steel plate test
Here you can see the SEVR after going through the steel plate twice and after having gone through the MDF. You can see the blades got pretty bent up and yet, it held together. Pretty impressive.

One last thing I think is worth noting on the Ti 2.0… If you already have the old 2.1 heads, you can just order the blades for the 2.0 and swap them out. These can be used with the ferrule of the 2.1. So, it’s nice that you can do that. If you want to pick up some penetration from the 2.1s that you already have, just get the new blades and put them in there.

sevr ti 2.0 scorecard
Final scorecard for the SEVR Ti 2.0


Sevr Robusto Broadhead Review

sevr robusto

The Robusto is marketed as a crossbow broadhead, but it can easily and very effectively be to used through a vertical bow as well.

A Closeup Look At The SEVR Robusto

So, let’s check out this Robusto broadhead!

sevr robusto profile view

The Robusto has the same blade deployment system as the other Sevr expandables, so it will work great out of vertical bows. It’s just 150 grains, so you have to account for that extra 25 grains if you’re used to a 125-grain heads or extra 50 grains if you use 100-grain heads. But, that also increases your FOC a little bit. It increases your momentum a little bit as well. So, I like that extra bit of weight in the 150-grain.

sevr robusto silicone ring

The blades are held in place really strongly by the silicon O-ring. It’s a really thin ring, but it’s silicon, so it doesn’t dry rod or freeze. The overall profile of the Robusto is super small in the closed position. That’s what makes these one of the very best flying heads. This, just like all of the SEVRs, should fly incredibly well.

robusto compared to 1.5 and 2.0

The Robusto is all-stainless steel, whereas in the 2.0 and the 1.5, the ferrule is made out of titanium. Here, it’s all stainless steel.


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robusto cut width of tip

The tip, by my measurements, has a 0.33″ cut when closed. And, when fully deployed, the Robusto has 2″ of cut the other way. So overall, 2.33″, which is a pretty nice cut.

sevr robusto screw hole

Now, you notice there is this little hole for a set screw right here. It’s in each individual pack of broadheads. And, you just screw it in. This keeps the blades in the closed position. So, you can practice with them and shoot the same broadhead that you’re going to be hunting with, but in the closed position, so you won’t dull the blades, since they won’t contact the target at all. You just have to remember to take out that set screw before you go hunting, or you’re going to be really disappointed when the blades would not open!

Also, when you’re practicing using the set screw, you don’t need to use the O-ring!

So, the way the Robusto works, is that the small deployment arms, are blunt and angled forward. As they press on a medium like animal hide, they push and indent the hide just a little bit and then the blades spring open and it gets a bit bigger cut than just the advertised 2″. That’s the theory of it.

sevr robusto starting to open

The pressure causes that O-ring to expand and it slides back or cuts off, and then the blades come into their open position and they lock in the open position. And that’s one of the things that’s really unique about the SEVR is that blades lock. They have a little mechanism in the back where the two blades butt up against each other and they come into the lock position.

sevr robusto blades locking in position

The Robusto in the fully open and locked position.

sevr robusto locking mechanism

Even if there’s not pressure pushing the blades, they’re still going to stay in that open position. Whereas, most Gator Blades, if there’s not pressure, they’re just going to collapse. They’re just going to go back down. These would not due to the locking mechanism.

Another thing this does is it allows the blades to pivot, and that’s kind of SEVR’s claim to fame is to cut straight through. A lot of times, what happens with a big 2-blade mechanical, is that as it penetrates, if one of the blades hits a heavy bone, which causes a deflection, drastically changing the arrow’s direction.

And, you’re thinking, “I made a perfect shot,” but then the arrow changes direction within the animal because of that deflection, and you can end up losing the animal.

sevr robusto cutting diameter with one blade closed

The pivot allows it to hit a bone and then the blade just folds back and it stays on course.

Now, you’re not going to get as much of a cut if that blade goes back. However, you’re going to get more than just that one blade because the blade is going to stick out. So, you’re not going to get the whole cut, but you’re still going to get quite a bit.

Now, one of the drawbacks of this can be that if it hits a bone one side right before it exits, then you might get an exit with just this cutting diameter. Now, you are still getting the 0.33″ one way, and you’re getting more than 1″ the other way, so probably about 1-1-4/” overall, which would be a smaller exit hole.

But, unless that happens, it’s going to return right back into its fully open position. But, the tradeoff is that you aren’t absorbing a lot of energy if one blade is hit, but then you might get a smaller exit.

I’ve taken many animals with the Sevr heads I’ve seen that happened one time where I had like an inch and a quarter exit hole, but it really was inconsequential as far as harvesting the animal.

sevr robusto blade thickness

The blades of the Robusto are 0.032″ thick, so pretty average thickness to the blades. But again, because of that design feature, they’ve proven over the years pretty durable.

sevr robusto o-ring receiver in blade

You’ll notice also there’s a little divot here in the blades. That’s just where the O-ring goes. It’s not like there’s a chip in the blade. That’s not because it contacted the ferrule or anything. That’s just where the O-ring goes so it doesn’t get cut.

sevr robusto how to unlock blades

To get the blades closed, I just like to put my finger over it. I’m not even really touching the blade. And then with my thumb nail, I push up on one of these little ends of the blades and then the other one just slides under it. It comes with a little plastic tool you can do this with, but it’s just as easy to do it with your nail like that. And then there it is in the closed position. When it opens, it pops. You can hear a little snap.

For the Robusto tests, I used my Bowtech CP28 for most of the shots. I used the SR6 for one of them. And, I used Bishop FOC King Arrows for most of the shooting, and the Bishop FAD Eliminators for the really hard impact shots because they are just so incredibly durable.

Robusto Testing

I was eager to put the Robusto to the test! Let’s see how it performed!

Flight Forgiveness

sevr robusto flight test

I shot one field point and one Robusto at 30 yards.

Initial Sharpness

sevr robusto initial sharpness test

The initial sharpness of the Robusto registered at 200.



Penetration Test 1 (2/3″ rubber mat, 1/2″ MDF, FBI Gel):   

sevr robusto ballistic gel test

The Robusto penetrated 6-1/2″. I know it doesn’t look like that, but if you look closely, you can see this thing that happens with the gel. There is a cut that goes in front of the tip that extends about an inch-and-a-half beyond where the final resting place of the head is. And with gel, it shoots forward and then kind of compresses back sometimes. And that’s what happens. The blades opened very well and stayed opened. They’re at an angle and so it looks like they are pretty closed, but they’re actually their full cutting position.

Edge Retention Test (sharpness after Penetration Test 1): 225

sevr robusto edge retention test

The Robusto registered 225 after the MDF/ballistic gel penetration test.

Penetration Test 2 (layered cardboard):

sevr robusto cardboard test

The Robusto penetrated through 54 layers of cardboard.

Opening Test (Leather stretched over box):

sevr robusto entry hole in leather

You can see that the blades opened up almost to their full cutting diameter of 2″ on impact.

sevr robusto blade opening width in target

And, the blades locked open as you can see the impact into the target right behind the cardboard box here.

Durability Test (1/2″ MDF max 3 shots):

sevr robusto after 3 times into MDF

The Robusto was in perfect condition after going through the MDF 3 times.

Durability (22 gauge steel plate max 2 shots):

sevr robusto steel plate holes

Here are the holes the Robusto made in the steel plate.

sevr robusto after steel plate test

And it’s still in really good condition after going through the steel plate 2 times. And then here are the holes in the steel plate as well.

Durability Test (Concrete I Shot):

sevr robusto stuck in concrete

The Robusto stuck in the concrete block!

sevr robusto after concrete block test

So here’s the Robusto after all the durability tests. It went through the MDF and the steel plate, and held together very well through all of those. The blades are in really excellent shape. It actually stuck in the concrete, which was really impressive. But, you see that it did get a bend to it. It looks kind of like a Concord jet. The tip is actually really pointy. It got a tiny bit of a curl to it, but stayed together really well. Obviously, it’s not reusable with that kind of a bend, but it held together relatively well considering that it’s about 750 grains being shot out of a 72-pound bow at 5 yards into the cinder block. So, for that, to hold together, stick in the cinder block and to only have that kind of damage is pretty impressive durability, especially for a mechanical.

Final Thoughts On The SEVR Robusto

So what do you think of the Robusto?

Man, I tell you, it’s another winner of a broadhead by SEVR. I love their 1.5. I love the 2.0. And I like the all-steel Robusto as well. I like the slick design to it, and that tip penetrates just a little bit better. I like that it’s all steel. You get a little bit of extra FOC and momentum by being 150 grains.

I was a little surprised that it bent and buckled a bit when it stuck in the concrete. But, a lot of fixed blades can’t do that. It did hold together but it’s the first time that I’ve shot any SEVR in the concrete and had it experience a bend like that.

So, I don’t know if it just hit an extra hard part in the concrete or what, but overall, the durability was just incredible and its performance was very good.

It actually got an even higher score than the SEVR 2.0. The 2.0 had gotten the highest score of any broadhead mechanical or fixed that I had tested up to this point. And now, the Robusto just replaced that as like the highest score.

Things I Wish Were Different About The Robusto

There are a few things I wish were different with the SEVR Robusto, but the main thing is I wish the deploying arms didn’t cover up some of the blade.

You leave it open and you go, “Hey, how come these blades or these little deploying arms are sticking out like that?” People ask me that question all the time and yet at the same time, I would think that they would impede the penetration and yet, they don’t. It still penetrates quite well.

Everything in broadhead is a tradeoff. And, the benefit of having that mechanism that causes the blades to deploy properly and interlock, is the interlocking, pivoting, and strong, shock-absorbing nature of it. The drawback is it covers up some of the blades and yet, in terms of penetration, total cut size, blood-letting, and so forth, it really hasn’t been proven to be any kind of a problem.

I love this Robusto head. And, again, props to SEVR on another great broadhead!

sevr robusto lusk grade

SEVR Broadheads Review Conclusion

When I first heard the SEVR broadheads were hitting the market, I had a lot of hope that they penetrate well and hold up well with the changes made to the new models. These heads have exceeded my expectations.

In terms of flight, I knew they would fly extremely well. And, they fly as good as any mechanical head I’ve ever tested. They are like a field point in flight, flying right up there with the very best.

In terms of penetration, they were excellent, maintain outstanding durability as they were shot into 4 total layers of ½-inch MDF, a steel plate and foam mat.

So the SEVR 1.5 and 1.7-inch are really a good heads for bowhunters to consider for various animals.

boat tops hero image

Types Of Boat Tops | Which One Is Best For You?

Choosing to add a boat top is one of the best ways of preserving your boat’s value and enjoying shade as you spend your day on the waters. Since there are various types of boat tops, knowing what differentiates each model is crucial, as this will come in handy when selecting the best option for your watercraft. In this article, we look at seven types of boat tops.

1.   T-Tops

t-top boat top

T-Tops provide full standing height for the boat operator and can provide helpful additional storage and extra protection for your center console.

T-tops are designed to provide overhead cover by fitting around a boat’s center console. These boat tops are getting quite popular among boat owners as they offer full standing-height shade while protecting your center console from harsh elements.

In addition to providing weather protection, top-quality models like Stryker T-Tops are built to improve the looks of your boat and make your fishing trips more exciting as they offer additional overhead storage.

You will also have the freedom to opt for a folding T-top, especially if you store your boat in a garage with a standard door or have to use low clearance bridges in your area.


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2.   Bimini Tops

bimini top boat top

Bimini tops can be deployed when needed, are foldable and are primarily used for protection from the sun.

Bimini tops are free-standing open canvas structures supported by metal frames that sit over a boat’s cockpit.

Unlike T-tops that are designed to remain standing after installation, Bimini tops are foldable and only deployed when needed.

These boat tops are also primarily used to offer protection from the sun as they are not covered on the front or sides.

Bimini tops also come with storage solutions that can help hold wakeboards and inflatable tubes.


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To get the most out of your Bimini top:

  • Avoid leaving it out indefinitely
  • Fold it when not in use to improve its lifetime
  • Use a brush and hose to remove debris from your canvas to keep it looking at its best
  • When going at high speeds, don’t keep the bimini top deployed


3.   AFT Covers

aft boat curtain

AFT covers offer great protections from the elements and are a great way to stay warm and dry on the water.

AFT covers are enclosures attached to the back of a boat’s top extending to the aft, where they are secured.

These covers offer protection from the sun and other elements like wind, rain, and spray.

AFT covers can contain windows, side panels, and doors to allow visibility and user access while providing privacy in the aft deck area.

As such, they are a great way to stay warm and dry while enjoying the waters, which is an extra plus for boat owners who regularly take and teach kids about the outdoors.



4.   Convertible Tops

convertible boat top

Convertible tops differ from Bimini tops in that they can extend and cover the seating areas as well as the helm.

Convertible tops are designed to cover a boat’s entire open windshield area and are primarily used for protection in foul weather.

The main difference between these boat tops and Bimini tops is that they are attached to the windshield and can extend to cover the seating and helm areas.



Convertible boat tops are also commonly used on small powerboats and speedboats, and can easily be removed when they are not in use. They are easy to set up, remove and store.

You can make a convenient pathway to the bow with a walk-through zipper at the center of the window. You can also add front doors for more visibility and enclosures and curtains to enhance protection against the elements.

5.   Camper Tops

camper boat top

Camper tops cover the entire open areas of a boat and can be removed when needed.

Camper tops are enclosures attached to the back of a Bimini or convertible top to cover the back of a boat. It comes with its frame and helps enclose the entire open area of a boat, so everyone on board is protected against harsh elements.

Since it is not necessary to use camper tops at all times, these enclosures can easily be removed and set up to suit your needs.

A camper top converts your open boat into a cozy cabin on the water, protecting you and your passengers against rain and wind and offering shade during summer. T



To find a boat camper top that best suits your vessel, pick the depth or length, width, and height that sufficiently accommodates the boat and your needs.

The height and the depth/length help you establish how much shade a camper top will provide.

You should also look at the coverage area when the camper top is opened or deployed and where it will fall when closed and folded at the boat’s rear part. Ensure sufficient space behind and in front of the deployed top to set up eye straps for securing the hold-down straps.

6.   Storage Covers

storage cover boat top

Storage covers are just what they sound like… they protect your boat when it’s not in use.

Storage covers are meant to protect your boat when it is not in use.

Typically, storage covers work by protecting open and vulnerable areas of your vessel, and the most common options in the market are:

  • Cockpit covers, which are used to enclose the area from behind the windshield to the back of the boat
  • Tonneau covers, which are tight-fitting canvas tops mainly used on speed boats to protect the open bow areas. Some boaters leave these covers on even when they are out on the water and only remove them when they want to use the bow area
  • Bridge covers, which are commonly used on powerboats with a flybridge to cover the helm, instrument panel, and seating areas
  • Bow-to-stern covers, which are used to cover the entire extent of your boat from the bow to the stern


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7.   Full Top Enclosure

full enclosure boat top

A full top enclosure boat top will provide weather, sun and water protection.

Full top enclosures are an all-in-one boat top that gives you the benefits of having a Bimini top, bow cover, windshield connector, and aft covers by providing a full enclosure of your boat.

Since it is made of multiple pieces, it offers the flexibility of choosing whether you want total protection against harsh elements or want a specific part open to suit your needs.



For example, you could decide to leave the aft covers or side windows open so that you can enjoy fishing or a little sunshine.

A full enclosure boat top provides weather protection, UV rays protection, and sea spray and water protection. Combining styles and colors can help you create an eye-catching boat top that sets you apart from others.

Final Thoughts On The Different Types Of Boat Tops

As a boat owner, one of the best accessories you can invest in is the right boat top. When considering your purchase, always consider the intended use and ensure you order a fully customized model that suits your boat’s size.