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Should You “Slang” Arrows? | The Slang Blade Broadheads Review

Talk about a really weird, creative, and innovative broadhead!

I love testing this weird stuff, so I tested the Fire-N-The-Hole Slang Blade Broadhead.

slang blades open and closed

Talk about a wide cut! I couldn’t wait to start testing the Slang Blade broadheads and see how they measured up!

For this broadhead test, I used my Bowtech SR6 set at 72 pounds and Bishop FOC King Arrows for most of the testing and then the Bishop FAD Eliminators for the really hard impact tests.

If this is not the weirdest-looking thing you’ve ever seen, I don’t know what is!

But let’s go ahead and check out the Slang Blade closeup and then put it to all the tests.

The Slang Blade Broadheads Up Close

slang blade side view

Here’s a good look at the Slang Blade. I had to have the camera zoomed out because once I open the blade, the head would not fit in the screen! In the closed position which it is in right now, believe it or not, it’s only 7/8 of an inch in cutting diameter. You can see the O-ring that holds the blades together.

The ferrule is aluminum and the blades are mad of stainless steel.

slang blade cut width

But, as it flies and penetrates, the O-ring is forced back and the blades open up to their full cutting diameter, which is 4 inches!

The blades are pretty thick. They are 0.052 inch thick by my measurements and they are single bevel.

slang blade double beveled tip

The tip, the edge, the bevel, continue over this circular portion which becomes the tip. However, when the two single bevels line up, they are double bevel right there at the top. So that makes the tip extra stout.

I had no idea how the Slang Blade was going to perform but I was eager to put it to the test! So, let’s see how it performed!



Initial Sharpness

slang blade initial sharpness

The initial sharpness of the Slang Blade out of the box was 300.





Flight Test

slang blade from 40 yards

Here is the Slang Blade shot into my target from 40 yards away.



Penetration Test 1:

I shot the Slang Blade into ballistic gel fronted by 2/3″ rubber mat and 1/2″ MDF.

slang blade ballistic gel penetration test

It penetrated 4-1/2 inches. I know it doesn’t look like it in this picture but that’s just because of the angle of the camera.



entry hole in mdf test for slang blade

Here’s the entrance hole in the rubber mat. It was just its closed position at entrance.



slang blade exit hole in mdf test

And then here’s the exit on the back of that first layer of MDF and rubber foam mat. It opened up to 2 inches.





slang blade wound channel in ballistic gel

Here’s a really good shot of the wound channel. You can see that after about 1 inch into the gel, it reached its full opening position there of 4 inches and it stayed that way for the rest of the penetration. So, it took 2 inches to get to its full position and then it cut for another 2-1/2 inches after that.



Edge Retention Test:

slang blade sharpness test after mdf

The blade sharpness was 450 after the ballistic gel test.




Penetration Test 2: (layered cardboard)  

I shot the Slang Blade into layered cardboard to see how many it could penetrate.

slang blade cardboard penetration test

It penetrated through 35 layers of cardboard.




Durability Test: (1/2” MDF)

Below is a look at what happened when I shot the Slang Blade into 1/2″ MDF board.

slang blade after mdf impact

As you can see, one of the blades just came completely off. And then part of the base broke off as well. I’m not sure why that happened. And then the other blade that stayed intact got significantly bent. To be honest, I’m not super surprised, but I thought maybe it would hold up to at least one shot through the MDF. But that was not the case.



Slang Blade Broadheads Review Final Thoughts

So what do you think of the Slang Blade? I’ve got to give props to Fire-N-The-Hole for coming up with a creative, innovative design.

And, I love that wicked wound channel. It was cool to see that in the gel as well as in the cardboard.



It only penetrated through 12 of the layers of cardboard, but man, it cut its full width. With that 4 inch wide cut, it has an impressive cutting diameter.

But the flight and the durability of this head are severely lacking.

slang blade after 3 shots in target

You saw the lack of durability in the MDF test. But, also when I was shooting it into my target at distance, on the third shot, it lost both of its blades.



slang blade shot into apple

I thought I’d do something cool and shoot through an apple but it didn’t even open on the apple. So, it didn’t do anything more than a field point would have done. In addition, the blades got really messed up after that as well.



I didn’t even do the concrete test where I shoot into a cinder block and see how a head holds up, because honestly, I thought it would be irresponsible. I didn’t want that much blade just flying all over my house and back at me!

So, if you’re trying to choose a broadhead, check out the score sheet and see how it performed in the areas that matter to you the most.

slang blade scorecard
lusk grade on slang blade
rage trypan nc broadhead

Is this head all the Rage? | The Rage Trypan NC Broadheads Review

In this review, I tested the Rage Trypan NC, (no collar). I had been wanting to test this head for a while.

In this broadhead test I used my Bowtech SR6 set at 72 pounds and I used a Bishop FOC King Arrow for most of the shots, and then the Bishop FAD Eliminators for the really hard impact shots.

Let’s check out these broadheads and then put them to the test.

The Rage Trypan NC Broadhead Up Close

rage trypan nc close up

Here’s a good look at the head close-up. The ferrule is made out of titanium and it has been age-hardened, which is just a process of hardening where a solution is added to the metal and brought to a super high temperature. Then it is quenched and brought down to a really low temperature and then heated up to an intermediate temperature for several hours. It results in an extra hard ferrule that is extra durable, resistant to wear and readily machinable.

The blades of the Trypan NC are stainless steel. They are 0.039 inch thick, so, relatively thick. They are double bevel on both sides.

trypan nc fat adapter

Now, you’ve also got this little collar down here. This is not a retention collar. But rather, this is what they call their FAT adaptor, (Ferrule Alignment Technology), which just allows the ferrule to taper smoothly and transition smoothly into the end of the shaft right there.

As the “NC” implies, there is no collar, O-rings or clips like some other expandables have.

trypan nc blade opening lever

The blades deploy simply by pressure on these two like blunt wings or “bats” of the blade.

rage trypan nc in open blade position

The pressure causes the blades to slide back and reach their full open position, which is 2 inches. So, you’re getting a full 2 inches of cut, plus a about a quarter of an inch from the tip going in the opposite direction.

I was hopeful that the Trypan Hypodermic NC would be more durable than some of the other Rages that I’ve tested in the past. But, initially, it looked like a pretty cool head. So, let’s see how this Rage Trypan NC performed.


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Initial Sharpness Test

rage trypan nc initial sharpness test

The initial out-of-the-box sharpness test result: 225



Ballistic Gel Penetration Test

I shot the Trypan NC into ballistic get that was fronted with 1/2″ MDF and foam matting.

rage trypan nc ballistic gel test

The Rage Trypan NC penetrated 6 inches into the ballistic gel.

rage trypan nc wound channel in ballistic gel

Here you can see that the blades open to almost their full position upon impact. They had 1-1/2 inches of opening on their initial impact. But, then as you can see, the blades begin to close because they don’t lock open. They begin to close and they reached their closed position and then they just stayed in that position.


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Edge Retention Test

rage trypan nc sharpness after ballistic gel test

I tested the Trypan head after the ballistic gel test to see how well it retained its initial sharpness. The result was 275.



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Layered Cardboard Penetration Test

I shot the head into layered cardboard to see how it would penetrate.

rage trypan nc exit hole leather

The Trypan NC penetrated through 49 layers of the cardboard.



Blade Opening Test

rage trypan nc into leather

I tested the Trypan NC on leather that’s stretched tightly over a cardboard box.

rage trypan nc entry cut into leather

It opened one and a quarter inches on the initial impact.

rage trypan nc exit hole leather

And then by the back of the box, it had opened almost to its full 2 inches of cut, but a little short.



Durability Test

I shot the Trypan NC into MDF board 5 consecutive times to see how durable it was.

rage trypan nc after 5 shots into MDF

Here’s the head after going through the MDF 5 times. And as you can see, the blades did bend pretty significantly. That started to happen on the second shot. However, the ferrule is in excellent shape. It still spun perfectly well and the blades didn’t collapse. They didn’t bend laterally and they didn’t break off. So overall, I’d say this held up fairly well especially compared to the other Rages that I’ve tested.



Concrete Test

rage trypan nc shot into cinder block

I shot the head into a cinder block to see how it would fare…

rage trypan nc after cinder block test

Here’s the head after impacting the concrete. On the good side, it penetrated really deeply into the concrete. And also on the good side, it held together. It didn’t break into a bunch of different pieces. On the bad side, it did bend considerably.

Now, I know we don’t hunt concrete, OK? So, you can hold back on your comments about that. But, this is a good test of the structural integrity of a broadhead. And again, the goal is just to expose the weak points a head may have.

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It doesn’t mean it’s not a great hunting broadhead. But, it does show you what’s going to happen in a zero penetration test on a really hard impact with things like heavy bone. This is a good indication of the weakness of that really vented titanium ferrule.



rage trypan nc scorecard
Scorecard for the Rage Trypan NC


Final Thoughts on the Rage Trypan NC

So what do you think of the Hypodermic Trypan NC? You know, it performed better than I expected.

I’ve come to kind of expect that most of the Rages that I test are just going fall apart. But these didn’t. They bent, but they didn’t break and they have lot of good things going for them.

Now, ad for the “NC.” It’s an advantage in some ways that you don’t have to mess around with the collars and the bands and stuff like that.



And, I know usually even when a mechanical doesn’t open well in testing, it usually does OK on animals because of the hide, and the body behind that hide, and the tissue being stretched really tight and so forth.

And, while the Trypan NC has a wide cut, they gave me a bit of pause and concern about how they would open.

Check out the score sheet below and see how they performed in the areas that matter to you the most and see how they stack up to other mechanicals of this size.



rage trypan nc lusk grade
The Rage Trypan NC got 6 Golden Arrows.


2 bucks large antlers

BIG Bucks | The Best Deer Minerals For Antler Growth

I can still remember the first time I laid eyes on a white-tailed buck in velvet.

I remember I was riding with my Dad on our ranch, standing up in the front seat, eyes glued to the windshield, intently watching.

Being 6 years old. I loved doing that. But, what I didn’t know was the next curve on that road would change me forever!

buck in velvet in field

The impact mineral sites can have on overall herd health and antler growth are precisely what’s needed for reaching full genetic potential. When combined with herd & habitat management the potential becomes astonishing. (photo credit: Colton Beam)

As we came around the back side of the pond, a young 9-point jumped out right in front of us. He was standing no more than 20 yards from the truck, not a care in the world, as if he knew we were no danger to him. He just stood there.

At that very moment, seeing his horns in full velvet and not understanding why they had fur on them, would spark an infatuation that would change my life. 



As odd as it may sound, I never wanted to be a Fireman or Astronaut. I never wanted to play professional Football or Baseball like most kids my age. All I wanted was to do whatever I could involving white-tailed deer.

To say I was captivated from such a young age feels like a major understatement! The riveting fascination that took hold of me that day, thus far, has yielded a lifelong thirst for knowledge.




two bucks in velvet

The difference in antler size is heavily influenced by proper mineral nutrition.



From fascination to education

Fast forwarding 30 years, that pursuit of knowledge has le me down many different paths, one being the Wildlife Biology program at Texas Tech University.

But enough about me, antler growth is what this is all about!

So, if adding a Mineral site to help increase antler growth in your bucks is what you looking to achieve, let’s talk facts! My goal is to simply shed some light on the benefits of utilizing minerals in antler growth, and more importantly, to explain the complexities of mineral nutrition in deer by putting it in layman’s terms, so everyone can understand.



Minerals 101

Minerals, in a deer’s diet, are extremely important to overall health and productivity. First, you should understand there are multiple mineral requirements, some more imperative than others, depending on the situation.

deer at mineral site

Minerals drastically increase the quality of milk a lactating doe produces in Spring & Summer for fawns.

Some of the required quantities are so small, they don’t require special attention. Nevertheless, when it comes to the most evidential sources, Calcium and Phosphorus are the most important; these two minerals are the main constituent for bone and antler development.

There are also other minerals that serve a vital role, some not as evidential. Nonetheless, their role shouldn’t be disqualified because they aren’t as obvious, as it’s important to know them.



For example, Copper, Zinc, Sodium, Selenium, Iodine, Magnesium and Manganese are such minerals. Each serve important roles, but can become very complex when it comes to how much or how little of each is needed so deficiencies or toxicities don’t occur.




The need and requirement of minerals by deer change season by season, year to year.

Rain, or the lack there of, is a major contributor to the availability of natural resources. A quality habitat provides a nutritional foundation for deer that ensures reproductive success, herd health, support of healthy population numbers, and antler growth.




A diversity of forbs, shrubs, browse and some grasses provide a great food source for your deer. Certain regions can even yield impressive percentages in mineral and crude proteins.

Having well-nourished deer helps them achieve their genetic potential. However, in years of drought or low rain fall, these resources are drastically affected, and that is when a good mineral site becomes a vital resource for your deer.                                                                                       



Which Deer Minerals To Buy

It’s overwhelming how many mineral mixes are available these days, all claiming astonishing success or promising massive jumps in antler growth. So, how is someone supposed to decide on the right mineral and know they aren’t wasting their money?



Here are a few key points that will help in narrowing down your search for a quality product.

  1. Make sure the list of ingredients on the bag has all the minerals listed above. None of them should be left out! Believe it or not, some on the market don’t even contain Phosphorus, which is key for antler development.   
  2. “Attractants and Flavors”– These are an industry gimmick, designed to make you, the consumer, think the product will perform better. Quality ingredients don’t need to be masked with artificial flavors or attractants for deer to want them!
  3. Sodium (salt): While there is no doubt salt is crucial for deer at certain times, it is highly overused. First, if it says “Salt Mineral” or “Salt Mineral Lick” anywhere, walk away! If the percentage is greater than 35%, walk away! Anytime the sodium (salt) is 35% or greater it takes away nutritional value of everything else, including Calcium and Phosphorus.

(I’ll speak further regarding Sodium & attractant/flavors in upcoming blogs

deer drinking with fawn

The “where,” “when,” and “how” of mineral sites is critical to know when getting your mineral sites started. (photo credit: Dwight Korenek, Burnt Oak Ranch)

Getting Your Mineral Sites Started

Where: Normally, having a site every 25-75 acres is key. But, you need to consider your property and the density of your deer herd, first. So, to start out, make it simple, start your sites close to where you know the deer are. The deer will tell you everything you need to know if you pay attention, trail cameras have made this possible, they allow you to not only monitor the activity but the deer’s desire/dependability for the mineral and the site.  



When: This varies from state to state, so make sure to check your local game laws. I prefer starting at the end of winter (post-rut) through August. Starting early helps provide a jump on putting body fat back on the bucks Most importantly, does are pregnant and in major need of quality nutrients for not just themselves, but the development of the fetus, which is the future of your deer herd!

How, keep it simple! You don’t have to clear an area, dig down a few inches, and cover it back with dirt after you’ve added the product. While there’s nothing wrong with that method, I just prefer a “simplified” approach.

deer mineral site directly on ground

Mineral site placement doesn’t have to be complicated. Simply clear and pour on the ground.

Depending on the ground cover, I’ll clear a 3-4 foot spot, and then pour the mineral right on the ground. If clearing isn’t needed, that’s even better, you can just pour it right on the ground!



PVC Deer Mineral Design

Another option I like that’s simple, is this PVC design. It works great in situations where your able to attach it to a stationary object like a fence post or tree.

pvc design for deer minerals

This PVC mineral dispenser is attached to a feeder and positioned to touch the ground. The mineral is gravity fed through the PVC and positioned at a slight angle to help the product flow properly. The PVC also helps protect the mineral from weather and allows it to last longer.

In Conclusion

Before concluding, I want to get you thinking about something I’ll talk more about in upcoming blogs. For starters, shifting your attention more toward your does and fawns.

Does are responsible for the development of fawns and fawns are the future of your deer herd. So, if you truly want bigger bucks, then you’ll learn the healthier your does are, the better start your fawns will get, which means your future bucks will have a better genetic potential.

I’ll also be discussing bioavailability, absorption, palatability and the importance of other key minerals your deer need in achieving better antler growth and overall health.



Buck and fawn standing in a dirt road

Fawns are the future of your herd! When they are provided with a surplus of minerals from day one, their genetic potential becomes greater, resulting in bigger bucks for the future. (photo credit: Colton Beam)

As I stated in the beginning, my primary focus was on the basic understanding of minerals and the role they play in antler growth, so everyone could understand.

With so many blogs and articles out there, mostly written toward a specific product a company is selling, I felt it was important to start this “series” strictly to share knowledge.

I undoubtable am a believer in “knowledge is power” and with the proper knowledge, I hope it helps you can gain the confidence needed to properly manage your deer.

If you’d like help managing your whitetail property, you can reach me at:

Brandon Houston of H3 Whitetail Solutions
Brandon Houston of H3 Whitetail Solutions

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