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bow hunting tips picture of man with bow and arrow

Bow Hunting Tips From N1 Outdoors [So You Can Be Ready When The Moment Of Truth Comes]

Bow hunting is a fun and adventurous way to hunt wild game. Many who have experienced success at it will tell you that there’s nothing quite like it.

Whether you are looking for information on bow hunting for beginners or even a seasoned veteran, we hope to provide you with helpful bow hunting tips to help you in your quest to become a better bow hunter.

  1. Bow Maintenance
  2. Blind Bale Shooting
  3. Aim Small / Miss Small
  4. Hunting Stances
  5. Off-Season Practice

Check out the FIVE archery video tips below to get valuable information on how you can be sure you have an arrow that’s “Just Pass’N Through!”

Bow Hunting Tips: #1 – Bow Maintenance | Avoid Freak Accidents Like This One…

When you see this freak archery accident, you’ll want to learn what you can do to help prevent the possibility of it ever happening to you.

Bow hunting is more than just flinging arrows. bow maintenance checks in the off-season, as well as before your hunt, are an extremely important part of being sure you are able to bow hunt safely and avoiding injury.

In the first of our bow hunting tips, we’ve got details on how to do preventative bow maintenance, so you can avoid unnecessary accidents like this one when shooting your bow…

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Archery Accidents And How To Avoid Them

If you watched the above video, you’ll understand why bow maintenance is an important part of bow hunting.

Some of you are shooting your bow year round, but some of you put it into storage during the off season and because the temperatures can change in those environments, it’s very important to check bowstrings cables as well as your limbs before shooting.



Bow maintenance checklist [Pre-Shoot Checklist]

Here are some things you should check before you shoot your bow:

  • Be sure before every shoot that you check your strings and your cables for any signs of wear or fraying. Anything like that can be a potential for a broken string or cable during a hunt just like in the video above.
  • Be sure you check your limbs very carefully. You want to be sure there’s no signs of splintering, bubbling, or cracking. Extreme temperatures and sometimes even storage can cause limbs to weaken. And, you don’t want to have one of those limbs be damaged or break during a shoot.
  • Be sure all your screws and any bolts are tightened properly, so that you don’t have any of your accessories loose during a shoot.
  • Check your cams. Be sure you don’t have any nics or cuts that would affect your string in any way,  whether it be to cause a fraying or a cutting of the string, or else damage to a cam, where your string may actually even come off the track.
  • Be sure your rest is aligned properly.
  • Check cam rotation and be sure the cams are not warped and that they both reach letoff at the same exact time.
  • Be sure you get the proper arrow spine for your bow set up.

If you are not sure how to check the above items, we recommend you take to your local bow shop and have them look for you and inspect that, so that you can have the best chance of a safe shoot.

Tip #2 – Blind Bale Shooting [Improve Your Archery Technique]

In this N1 Minute archery tips video, learn how closing your eyes can be the best way to see results in your archery and bow hunting technique.

bow hunting tips blind bale shooting

Stand back a few feet from a large target. Draw back and locate your target. Close your eyes and shoot. This drill will help grip, form, anchor point and release techniques. Put all these techniques together N1, and you’ll be seeing the results soon.

Tip #3 – Aim Small Miss Small [Improve Your Accuracy]

In the third of our bow hunting tips videos, 3D archery tournament shooter, Cole Honstead, shows you a “small” tip that could help you BIG during hunting season!



Tip #4 – Hunting Stances Can Make Or Break A Bow Hunt [So, Know Them All!]

In the below N1 Minute archery tips video, learn about various stances that can help you in all types of bow hunting scenarios.

For those of you who have bow hunted any amount of time, you know that some things can happen during a hunt that simple target practice can’t prepare you for. The video above will show you some archery tips to help you be best prepared when your moment of truth comes.



Archery Stances For Bow Hunting

Hunting stances can be used for everything from spot and stalk hunts in the West to using blinds and tree stands in the east.

For tree stand hunting, try your best to get to the elevated position. This is as simple as finding the hill and using the bed of a pick-up.

For spot and stalk hunts, try practicing using incline and decline slopes. When shooting from a blind, you’d better get used to sitting in a chair or kneeling position.

Practicing these stances throughout the off season will give you that confidence for a shot of a lifetime.

Tip #5: Off-Season Bow Practice [You’ll Hunt Like You Practice]

In this N1 Minute, learn some bow hunting tips on how to to keep your archery skills polished and sharp during the off-season so that you can maintain proper archery form.




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Archery Practice Tips

You know for us bow hunters, this is the time of year that we practice and practice for. But what about when the season’s over? How do you keep your skills sharp?



Archery exercise for bowhunters

Here’s a simple tip to keep those muscles active after hunting season and all it takes is a simple exercise band.

So many hunters put away their bows, after the fall, through winter, until turkey season. With, one of these exercise bands, you can practice your draw cycle throughout the winter and make that first draw in the spring a little easier.

Simply grasp one end of the band with your front hand and with your drawing hand, pull the band back to your anchor point. Repeat this ten to fifteen times and then switch hands. This will work both your back and shoulders. A few sets of this draw cycle exercise a day, and you’ll be ready to hit the mark on your next 3D shoot or Spring turkey hunt.

We hope you have found our bow hunting tips to be useful in your quest to become better at your craft. We hope you have an arrow that’s Just Pass’N Through!

To view other hunting and fishing tips videos, simply click on the “videos” link in our menu.

Target Panic Archery Tips Pic

Don’t Panic… It’s Just Target Panic | How I Cured It

At the time of writing this article, I have been shooting bows for about 14 years. I remember the first time I heard someone mention aiming drills because they were “panicking” when they would shoot their bow.

I thought they were crazy.

Boy, did I ever find out that my time with target panic was coming.

target panic poor groupings

Ever have this type of result when shooting your bow? Maybe you are experiencing target panic.

So, What Is Target Panic?

Target panic is basically being afraid of missing the target, thus causing an anxiety of sorts.

It wasn’t until the Summer of 2018 that I found myself having a problem with target panic. I first noticed it at one of the Total Archery Challenges. My shot process would fall apart every time that I would draw and try to take aim at one of the 3-D targets.

As I fought through the rest of the summer, I forced myself into thinking I could just ignore it, shoot more, and it would get better. I did this nonsense all the way through late fall. 


Five Steps To Fix Your Target Panic

archery target panic picture

Target panic in archery and bowhunting is a real thing… so how can you fix it? Keep reading!

The first step to curing target panic… Admit you have a problem.

Time needed: 15 minutes.

Follow these steps to begin to fix your target panic:

  1. Aiming Drills

    Hold your pin on the target until you start to waver let down rest 15 to 30 seconds and repeat. Do this at least 30 to 50 times a day before you release a single arrow.

  2. Go Through Your Shot Process

    Know how to, grip, draw, anchor, aim, and squeeze the trigger. This is your shot process… master it.

  3. Stay Close

    Shoot with in 15 yards of the target and don’t go any farther for at least 2 to 3 weeks.

  4. Move Back

    Once you can go through the shot process and not experience any anxiety, then start with 20 yards and work your way back.

  5. Repeat

    Go Back and repeat steps 1 through 3.



From Bad To Worse… To Missing Completely

I somehow managed to harvest an elk in early September, with one of the best shots I’ve ever made.

Looking back it was a miracle or just luck. That’s the only way to explain it with all the struggles I was having. After elk season, I didn’t shoot much for a few weeks until I was getting ready for archery whitetail season.

This is when things got worse.

While shooting one day at a 3D deer target, I started missing completely at 40 yards. I was only hitting the deer every two or three shots! Needless to say, my issue was getting expensive very quickly, at the loss of several Easton Full Metal Jackets. From an archery standpoint, I was pretty much falling apart. I knew then that I had a big problem.

Obviously, everyone reacts differently, but the following is the detail on what happened to me.



Itchy Index Finger…

As I was going through my shot process, I would nock an arrow, attach my release to the D-loop, draw the bow and find my anchor.

After this is where I was a complete mess.

When I would go to acquire the target in my peep, my heart would begin to race, my mind would scramble, and the second that my pin would reach the desired spot on the target, my index finger would have a mind of its own and just yank the trigger.

This wasn’t just an errant arrow or two. Basically, I was shooting my bow the same way you would shoot at clay pigeons with a shotgun.

Those who have been in archery for any length of time know that, with all that movement, it was impossible for me to have any type of grouping. I was anticipating the shot so badly, that I simply could not be accurate.

So, If you cannot simply draw your bow, acquire and hold on your target, then squeeze your trigger without anticipating the shot, I am willing to say that you have some sort of target panic.

How I Cured It

First things first… you have to ADMIT you have a problem. When I finally came to terms with the fact that I was experiencing target panic, I began calling around to a few of my friends that have been shooting for years.  I got several different answers.  I also watched YouTube, read articles, Googled information, and tried a pile of other things.

This quick and easy to practice archery tip is helpful when working to cure target panic.


Archery Coach

Now, I’m not saying everything that I tried and learned didn’t work. For the most part, it was all great info. But, I wasn’t getting any better. Finally, once I got sick enough of not being able to hit the broad side of a barn, I got in touch with a local pro named Gregg Copeland.

Gregg is a phenomenal coach, who I had met at a few indoor, Vegas-style shoots. He had me to meet him at the local bow shop that had an indoor range, so he could see how bad things really were.

Thankfully, I don’t get my feelings hurt very easily, because my shooting was downright laughable. I also enjoy joking around and Gregg knew that.

After my first 3 shots he told me that he would let me shoot at him at 40 yards and not worry a bit. This is all the more funny if you’ve ever seen Gregg… he’s 6’3”, 350lbs!

“First things first,” Gregg said. “We start with aiming drills.”



Target Acquisition Drill

He placed me 10 feet from the target. He then had me nock an arrow, draw the bow, and hold the pin on the target until I started wavering. I would then let down, rest for a minute, and repeat.

I would say that we did this 20 to 30 times. By the end of the aiming drills, I was able to at least aim without completely losing my cool. A huge sign of progress already! Aiming was something I hadn’t been able to do in months!




Tension Release Drills

Next, Gregg had me tighten the tension on my bow release to as stiff as it would go. This forced me to squeeze the trigger until the shot went off, so I that I could no longer “punch” the trigger, as I had been doing.

Now, keep in mind, we never moved back any from the aiming drills. We were still only 10 feet away from the target.

We went through the release drills a good 20 to 30 times. By the end of those, I was able to make decent shots at 10 feet. At that point, Gregg could have told me to stand on my head and I would have done it, because the sequence he had me doing was working!

I was taking each piece of advice like it was gold, and to me it was.

He wanted to see how I would do if we stepped back to 15 yards. Sure enough, in that short time, I was able to repeat what he had taught me and hit right where I was aiming.

Archery Homework

After the lesson we shook hands and he left me with instructions of what to do once I got home. Gregg told me to go and set up at ten feet from a target and practice aiming drills every day before I shot a single arrow.  He also forbid me to shoot a single shot past 15 yards until I was able to make perfect shots at that distance. I did these exact drills for at least a month.

man nocking an arrow

Going through your shot process the same way every time is a critical to curing archery target panic.

So, Does It Work?

Following Gregg’s instructions, I rarely missed a single day of shooting. After about a month of nothing but the daily drills, the anxiety finally subsided and I was able to enjoy shooting my bow once again.

I am now able to shoot pie plate groups out past 80 yards. I am not saying I am currently the best that I have ever been, but I am well on my way.

One of the things that I took from shooting with Gregg was how much importance he put on the shot process.

He told me multiple times, “without a shot process, you have no shot.”  He said, “without all the right ingredients, you can’t cook what you desire, so you sure ain’t going to shoot what you desire with out the exact process every time.”

Look at it this way, if you are struggling with target panic, with the right methods, and hard work, you are only 3,000 to 6,000 shots away from it being “fixed”, and yes, it is fixable.





Final Thoughts

Now, I try and do things that might trigger target panic. For instance, I will shoot at a 3-D deer out to 70 yards, extremely quartered away. I also have a basket ball size target that I will try and shoot at farther distances as well.

By doing these things, I am simply just trying to make myself uncomfortable. This way, I can remember my shot process, regardless of the situation, and still make the shot smooth and clean.

You do the same things at 20 yards as you would at 80 yards, you just have to convince your brain of that. Through this process, I have learned so much about archery and have experienced a whole new love for shooting my bow.

So, having target panic wasn’t so bad after all. I guess you could say there was a silver lining. I have 100% come through target panic as a better archer. Come September, the Elk better be on their “A” game, because I will be on mine.



If you have interest in researching various types of archery broadheads, be sure to check out our in-depth broadheads blog post and also get reviews on expandable broadheads as well as fixed-blades.


Target Panic Kyle Mcdonald
man shooting compound bow at target

Arrow Speed Calculator | FAST results!

Looking to get an estimate of your arrow speed based on your bowhunting setup? Try our arrow speed calculator below!

Arrow Speed Calculator
Bow Manufacturer IBO Speed
move slider or enter value
ft/sec
Draw Weight
move slider or enter value
lbs
Draw Length
move slider or enter value
inches
Arrow Weight
move slider or enter value
grains
Weight Added to String (20gr=peep only, 45gr=peep and tube)
move slider or enter value
grains
Estimated Arrow Speed:
/

Use the tool above to calculate the speed of your arrow!



When it comes to archery, IBO stands for International Bowhunters Organization.

What is IBO Speed and how is it calculated?

You might have seen where compound bows have an IBO rating.

But, what does that really mean?

Well, the IBO speed of a bow is calculated using a bow with a draw weight of 70 lbs, a draw length of 30 inches, and an arrow weight of 5 grains per pound of draw weight. So, that would mean a 70-lb draw weight would be shooting an arrow that weighs 350 grains (70 x 5 = 350).

That arrow is then shot through that bow through a chronograph, which measures the arrow speed. The average speed becomes known as the IBO rating of that particular bow.



The problem with IBO ratings

The problem with IBO ratings, however, is that they are not typical of most hunters’ setups.

For example, a 30-inch draw length is rather long for the average archer. Also, an arrow weight of 350 grains is simply not typical of most hunting setups. And, with high FOC arrows gaining popularity, the arrow’s grains per inch is often significantly greater.



So, when using the arrow speed calculator above, you must understand that the IBO rating you enter is based on this premise. The calculator will give you an estimate of how changing the inputs that make up IBO could affect your arrow speed.

The arrow speed calculator makes the following assumptions:

  • Every inch of draw length under 30″ will subtract 10 ft per second from the IBO value.
  • Every inch of draw length above 30″ will add 10 feet per second to the IBO value.
  • Every 3 grains of total arrow weight above draw weight multiplied by 5, will subtract 1 foot per second from the IBO value.
  • Every 3 grains of additional weight on the bow string will subtract 1 foot per second from the IBO value.


Other Inputs for Arrow Speed Calculator

After you have entered your bow’s manufacturer rated IBO, enter the following information:

  • The draw weight of your bow in pounds.
  • The draw length of your bow in inches
  • The arrow weight in grains (includes fletchings, wraps, inserts and also points/broadheads
  • Total string accessory weights in grains (peep, tube, silencers, etc.). For your reference, an estimated peep only weight is 20 grains, and a peep + tube is 45 total grains.



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