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ranch fairy holding high foc arrows

High FOC In Bowhunting | It’s About Impact

Trust me, I am not trying to cause a problem with all this heavy arrow stuff.

I was failing.

The Ranch Fairy and promotion of high FOC (Front of Center) arrow systems began because of failure at impact. 

High FOC Arrows | How and why they began to matter

Ok, so here’s the abridged version of how and why high FOC arrows became so important to me.  

I really like fishing, bowhunting, and shotguns.  (Of course, after 30 years of marriage – and still going – Mrs. Fowler is awesome too). 

So anyway, I killed a 150” deer in 2009 and just lost interest for “deer” hunting.  I became an adult along the way (which surprised me too), had kids, and helped them become quite competent adults and outdoors folks.

I did NOT, however, lose my love for hunting mature, feral hog boars.  They are every bit as challenging as a cagey whitetail, with additional features. Mostly, they suck up arrows like a vacuum and run off laughing. 

When you ask the guys at the local shop why they get away so often, they say something like, “big boars are just tough.” 

That’s it?  Just keep trying what you’ve got?  We don’t know anything else but “shoot fast and shoot a mechanical, ’cause they make huge holes?”

I was doing both (plus some fixed blades… guess we aren’t supposed to admit that!)  

FOC stands for “Front Of Center” (or Forward of Center), which indicates what percentage of the overall arrow weight is in front of the balancing point, or “center” of the arrow.

ranch fairy troy fowler with dead hog and iron will broadhead
Do you want exit wound when encountering humerus breaks, shoulder blades, and spinal columns? High FOC is the answer.

I nearly quit bowhunting

At one time, I was below a 50% kill rate on big boar hogs. And bro’, I live in Texas… we use bait, and shoot at known distances! 

Still, 90% of the pigs I killed (or lost) had 12 or more inches of arrow sticking out of them.  

There were poor blood trails, long nights, and lots of magically disappearing pigs. 

So, I almost quit bowhunting the big pigs.  I mean, I have guns.  After all, they are, as my buddy Chris says, “very efficient”.  

Enter one Dr. Ed Ashby and his incredibly in-depth Natal Study. 

Ed Ashby to the rescue

In his Natal Study, Ed Ashby identified 12 arrow penetration enhancing factors (visit www.ashbybowhunting.org for more information). 

I start reading and my mind starts melting!

He’s preaching: structural integrity, perfect arrow flight, rigid one piece single bevel broadheads, 350 grain points and inserts…..650 grain arrows?

ed ashby with an archery asiatic buffalo
Dr. Ed Ashby, here with an asiatic buffalo, stresses the importance of structural integrity and perfect arrow flight.

ARE YOU KIDDING?

I had no other thing to try. The archery shop “dock talk” wasn’t working.  

Now, this is not a popular thing, circa 2013. I mean, it’s completely irrational, right?

Except Ed was regularly killing Asiatic buffalo, including exit holes, and he had a couple rhino’s, with a bow, as a kicker. 

Oh, and just to check the man card, he used traditional gear. 

So, I jumped off the bridge and never looked back.  What did I have to lose?

Fast forward 7 years and hindsight being what it is, bowhunting is very simple… bowhunting is 100% equivalent to what happens at impact. And, how much penetration your arrow achieves will increase your success; not the bow, stabilizer, or whiz bang back tension release, or a miracle peep sight. 

The broadhead and arrow kill the animal. 

Which one is best?  Let’s move on.

Murphy’s Law (Anything that can go wrong will go wrong) certainly applies to bowhunting. But, what if we could have things go RIGHT more often?

What is a high FOC arrow?

So, Fowler “land the plane man!”  Get on with it… “what is a high FOC arrow?” 

Now, before we continue, you must realize that FOC or “front of center” is the measure of how much total arrow mass is in the front.  The industry says 8-12% FOC is normal. 

A high FOC arrow starts around 15% and can go up to 30%.

Just as a comparison, we are talking about 100 grain points vs 300-350 grain points. 

So, I’d agree wholeheartedly that 8-12% is normal FOC.  But that doesn’t answer a simple bowhunting question.  “Is that the optimal arrow FOC from bow to animal i.e., “in flight” or is it the optimal arrow FOC to get through the deer, hog or other animal?” 

The industry just leaves that as an assumption while moving on to bow tuning and other shenanigans.

How to calculate the FOC of an arrow

To determine the front of center (FOC) of your arrow, first install the inserts, points/broadheads, wraps, vanes, nocks, etc that you will be using on the arrow shaft. Once you have completed your arrow setup use the equation in the graphic below: 

foc equation graphic
  1. Divide the length of the arrow (indicated by “L” in the graphic above) by 2.
  2. Find the balance point. (The balance point is where the arrow balances perfectly on your finger or other object). Mark the balance point and measure the distance from that point to the bottom of the groove of the nock (this distance = “A” in graphic above).
  3. Subtract center of the arrow measurement (calculated in step 1) from the balance point measurement (calculated in step 2).
  4. Multiply the result from step 3 by 100.
  5. Divide the result from Step 4 by the arrow’s overall length (L). This result will be the FOC of your arrow.

FOC Calculator

If you don’t want to take the time to do the math to find your arrow’s FOC, you can always use an FOC calculator. Just be sure your arrow has the inserts, points/broadheads, wraps, vanes, nocks already installed.

high foc field points
Heavier inserts and field points/broadheads will help increase your arrow’s FOC.

The benefits of high FOC arrows

Before we jump off the FOC bridge, let’s clarify some things. 

  • Ashby Rule #1 – Structural Integrity: The arrow and broadhead system cannot fail, bend, or redirect at impact. 
  • Rule #2 – Arrow Flight: Perfect arrow flight is the enabler to penetration, when rule #1 is achieved. 

Structural integrity

Just so you know, I bare shaft tune each individual arrow before fletching, using the point weight I want to achieve for higher FOC.  I suggest you do the same. 

High FOC arrows often carry 300+ grain point or point / insert systems.  This places a tremendous amount of impact energy into a very small area, pulling the arrow into the target. 

Think of it like this.  You’re shooting a 300-grain bullet with a tail.  With lower FOC, you have a long object pushing a light point into sinew, meat, and bone. 

It’s like hitting a nail with a hammer. 

So, if you miss-hit the nail a little and your “arrow” goes sideways – it kills penetration. 

But, what if we could pull the nail into the board?  (Structural integrity, perfect flight assumed – you have to do that first).

Arrow flight

A second benefit of high FOC arrows is great arrow flight, which increases accuracy. 

During my journey, somewhere around 16% FOC, I started to see much more consistent grouping. It was like I was a better shot.  It just doesn’t take as much concentration on form and grip, etc. 

The heavier points, after proper bare shaft tuning, seem to pull the arrow along, and the fletch is just back there stabilizing the end of the arrow. 

ranch fairy troy fowler with feral hog
Since switching to high FOC arrows, my kill rate on tough feral hogs has gone to nearly 100%.

Better broadhead choice

Finally, the jump to these higher FOC arrow systems almost requires you to buy better broadheads, made of great steel. 

It’s not uncommon to have tool grade steels. The heads are machined, one-piece, and .08 thick. 

They are solid.  No fail points – (Rule #1 – Structural Integeriy… CHECK!)

For the bowhunter, this discussion may seem a bit off the rails. I would agree. The FOC town has an idiot, and I am he. 

However, my pig killing stats have gone to almost 100%.  Literally, if one gets away, I made a non-vital hit, and that’s on me. 

But, the adult arrows don’t fail anymore.  My arrows don’t break, the broadheads don’t bend or dull on impact, and penetration is almost always into the dirt (unless I hit a big off-side bone, which usually breaks, and turns the pig into a three-wheel drive unit. Pigs have short legs, so from an elevated position, its common to hit the ground before it passes through.) 

Conclusion

In closing, I am vitally aware a “normal” arrow system kills millions of critters a year of all sizes. 

Mechanical broadheads, the same.  I got that.  I’ve done it. 

But, what if you had an arrow system you knew, for a fact, was going to achieve an exit wound in the absolute highest number of situations – all  impact side humerus breaks, shoulder blades broken, and spinal columns snapped with almost 100% efficiency?   

What if we accept Mr. Murphy is still alive and well, but we used a tool to level that playing field?  

The next time you see your hunting arrow, you should ask, “Is my arrow system capable of almost any impact point OR only if I have perfect shot placement?”

Bowhunting is 100% equivalent to what happens at impact. And, how much penetration your arrow achieves will increase your success. 

ranch fairy troy fowler holding redfish
Troy Fowler, AKA The Ranch Fairy.
best fishing rod setup header image

The Best All-Around Fishing Rod setup | The Inside Information

When I used to work at a sporting goods store I used to get asked this question a lot:

“What is the overall best type of fishing rod that I can use for any type of fishing?”

When I was working at this store, the people that were coming in looking to buy something weren’t die-hard fishermen. They weren’t guys looking for a million different setups. And, they weren’t looking for reasons why they should buy an expensive setup.

All they really wanted was a rod to get out there and fish from time to time, and they wanted it to be logical and of decent quality.

So, I want to walk you through a specific rod setup that should allow you to fish for whatever you want. This is going to be a rod and reel combination based on size and power. That way, you’ll be able to get out there, and just fish a pond or whatever it may be with the same setup.

Best Fishing Rod setup | Rod and Reel Specifics

The rod that you will want to use in this setup is a 6’6” to a 7-foot, medium-action rod. You can certainly go medium-heavy if you want, but medium is usually a good all-around size rod to be able to handle the majority of fish you would catch.

best fishing rod length
A medium action 6’6″ – 7′ rod is the ideal size for the best all around fishing setup.
best fishing reel
A 2500 to 3000 size reel like this one is perfect for an all-around fishing rod setup.

Along with a rod of this size, I would recommend a 2500 to a 3000 size reel.

If you aren’t sure what those numbers mean, simply look on the reel. It will often say 2500 or 3000, or it may just have like a code name with some letters and after it, it’s going to say “30” or “25”, that way you’ll know what size it is.

fishing reel size numbers
The fishing reels will typically have the series numbers indicated on the reel, as in this picture. Go for a 2500 or 3000 series reel, which may also be indicated by a “25” or “30.”

These reels are going to allow you to hold an 8 to 10-pound test line, or even 15. And, if you guys are going to use braided line, they can hold up to 25-pound, 30-pound braid. So, it’s going to be a good size spool to have enough line to use the lures you need and catch the fish you want to catch.

Why Not Baitcasters?

So, why did I not recommend a baitcaster? Well, baitcasters can be complex, and it takes some skill and practice to use one.

However, a spinning reel will allow you to fish the majority of baits without much trouble. Most people are able to quickly learn to cast one of these and it’s just a good size rod to have all the time.

In addition, this size rod comes in one-piece as well as two-piece variations.

This type of setup is what I grew up learning to fish with initially; just a medium spinning rod that allowed me to fish for just about everything.

best all around spinning rod
This is a good travel rod that I use all the time when I just need to do all-purpose fishing. It’s a 2-piece, 6’6” rod. It’s a medium action and this is a size 30, or a 3000 series reel. It’s just a good all-around rod for me. I have it stringed up with 10-pound mono. I use this rod alongside the boat. I drop shot with it. I walleye fish with it. I go pond hopping for bass with it. If I’m really getting bored and the fish aren’t biting, I can even use it for catfish.

Now, some may say, “Oh, you can’t catch giant catfish or carp on those size rods because they’re going to break it.”

My answer to that is, you absolutely CAN.

Use some braided line, make sure you set your drag correctly and have a strong knot tied, and as long as you know how to angle that fish correctly, I can guarantee you you’ll get it to the shore or into the boat.

set drag appropriately on fishing reel
Setting the drag appropriately, according to the fish you’re after and the type of line you are using is key to landing a wide variety of fish.

So there you have it. That’s really all you need to know about what the best all-around fishing rod setup is.

Conclusion

I hope I gave you enough information on the best all-around fishing rod setup. This rod size and reel size combo is fairly inexpensive and it’s going to be a fishing rod you can keep in your car or in your house… perfect for the everyday angler.

So, whether you’re fishing on the weekends, or riding your bike around pond to pond; bass fishing, crappie fishing, or even looking to hook into a big catfish, it’s going to be an affordable and good-size setup to do everything you need to when it comes to fishing (well, maybe not shark fishing!)

I hope you put a hook N1!

jordan costanzo
Jordan Costanzo of TightlineTV
sevr 1.5 and 1.7 inch broadheads

Sevr Broadheads Review | What You Need To Know

-By John Lusk

In this broadhead review, I tested broadheads from SEVR; The SEVR 1.5, 1.7, 2.1 and Ti 2.0.

SEVR Broadhead Offerings

SEVR originally came out with a broadhead that had a 2.1” cutting diameter. It was a great head with fantastic flight and it was tough. But, the penetration is about what you would expect from a 2.1” broadhead and it was a bit lacking in kinetic energy for my purposes.  

For a deer, or even for smaller game like turkey, if your number one goal is a big hole, the 2.1” SEVR is going to deliver. But to round out their lineup, they’ve come up with two additional offerings.

sevr broadheads 15. and 1.7 inch diagram
The 1.5-inch and 1.7-inch SEVR broadheads look the same in shape, but with some subtle differences in head and ferrule composition.

SEVR 1.7-inch Broadhead

To compliment their original broadhead, SEVR introduced a 1.7” head. It has a stainless steel tip and it has got a good grade aluminum ferrule. It has rear deploying blades that lock in place, which I love.

The 1.7” cutting diameter provides decent penetration and is a good all-around broadhead offering for pretty much any kind of game.

SEVR 1.5-inch Broadhead

SEVR also introduced the 1.5-inch head. The 1.5-inch operates just like the 2.1-inch with a few design differences.

On the 1.7-inch head, the tip is not quite as big as the 1.5-inch head and also has a smaller ferrule.  The 1.7-inch head only comes in a 100-grain and is a little cheaper, while the 1.5-inch head comes in a 100-grain as well as a 125-grain.

SEVR 1.5-inch and 1.7-inch heads | The details…

Firstly, just as the name implies, the 1.5-inch head has a 1.5-inch cutting diameter. Also, the ferrule and tip on the 1.5-inch head are titanium, as opposed to the stainless steel tip and aluminum ferrule of its 2.1-inch predecessor.

The blades of the 1.5-inch head are stainless steel and lock into place just like the 2.1-inch head.

The 1.5-inch head is designed for big-bodied, heavy-skinned animals. It is also better for longer distance shots, due to the smaller cutting diameter.

Although the cut is 1.5” wide, the chiseled tip itself is approximately 5/16-inch wide. So, with the 1.5-inch width cut in one direction and the 5/16-inch wide tip cut in the other direction, you get a total of a little over 1-3/4 inches of cut with a 1-1/2-inch hole.  

Pricing

SEVR has a direct-to consumer approach, so you can only order them from their website. You can purchase them by the eaches, but you can get a better deal if you buy higher quantities.

At the time of this article’s publishing, the 1.7-heads are $11.99 each. The 1.5-inch head is $13.99. The 1.5 is more expensive due to the titanium head. You can purchase at SEVRbroadheads.com

Using code LUSKFIVE will give you $5 off any order at SEVRbroadheads.com!

Blades and cutting features

I love the way the SEVRs work. They have two small “wings” that are exposed during flight. When they come in contact with an animal, they actually “pre-stretch” the hide (skin) as the blades deploy. In theory, since the blades are rear-deploying, not only do you get a 4-cut entry, but you get a bigger cut.  

>>Hunting & Fishing Shirts with a story

The heads of the SEVRs also lock into place. So, unlike a lot of mechanical heads that can close down if there’s not a certain amount of pressure, these heads lock in place and they stay that way in the animal.

Because they lock in place, they will not give a smaller cut than they do at their full deployment. The blades will go back into pre-deployment position when removing from the animal, but will still lock back down in deployment position.

If you’ve ever shot a broadhead into a deer or other animal and hit bone, it typically deflects off course. But, the great thing about the SEVRs is that the will rotate to one side if they come they come into contact with bone or a hard medium like a rib. The blade will simply fall to the side that encounters the bone, allowing the other blade to continue cutting and still keeps the broadhead on track.

This feature helps increase the chances of getting a good exit and getting better penetration of lungs and other vitals when the head encounters bone. And, because the blades stay locked even as they rotate, they just “dance” around the bone.

sevr blade rotation
SEVR blades will rotate when coming in contact with bone or other hard surfaces, which helps prevent bending and breaking of blades and keeps heads on course.

Another nice feature to the SEVR broadheads is that when there is heavy pressure on the blades – the type of pressure that might bend or break both blades – they compressed ever so slightly to absorb some of that impact. Because of this feature, they are difficult to break.

Blade Thickness

The 1.7-inch heads have a blade thickness of 0.035-inch thick. The 1.5-inch heads have blades that are 0.032-inch thick. Both heads have all the same features, locking in place and pivoting around bone, staying on track.

I was excited that they came out with a 1.7 and came out with a 1.5 because the 2.1-inch was just a little bit much for me to be able to be confident that I would be able to get a pass-through on an animal.

Although I knew I would get a big hole, I needed to be confident that I would get pass throughs. And, when hunting large animals like elk or bear, I want to be sure I get deep penetration.  

Blade angle and overall cut

Another thing I like about the 1.5-inch head versus the original 2.1-inch head is that the blade angle is much less. So, penetration is not only better because of a smaller cutting area, but it’s also better because of the smaller angle.

The same with the 1.7-inch head. While it has a slightly larger cutting angle than the 1.5, it is still less than the 2.1. So, the 1.7 also gets better penetration, not only because of the angle, but because of the smaller diameter cut.  

Now, you might think, “Oh, 1.5 or 1.7 inches is kind of small.” But, there are not many fixed heads that have a 1.5-inch cut. They might have a combined 2-inch cut, with 1-inch one way and 1-inch the other way. But, what I have found with broadheads on game animals is that the wider a cut, the more effective bloodletting you will get.

On three and four-blade broadheads, although you may get more total tissue cut, you get a smaller cutting diameter. And, smaller holes tend to get plugged up easier with organs blood and tissue, resulting in less effective blood trails.

But, when you get a wider cut, even like a 1.5-inch, the hide and wound tend to stretch open as the animal moves, producing better bloodletting. Of course, with the 1.7, you would get even more. With the 2.1-inch head, you’re going to get a lot of bloodletting, but you are going to compromise penetration to do so.  

So, with the new SEVR lineup, you have something for everyone. But, what I really wanted to see was… how do they fly? They are really the same heads, so I just tested the 1.5-inch.  

SEVR flight

sevr broadhead in target
The SEVRs fly just like a field point, providing great accuracy, even at long distances.

When it comes to target shooting the SEVR heads, there is a feature that helps them stand out. Each head comes with a small set screw, so that when you shoot, the head stays in a closed position. Because the blades do not deploy, they don’t touch the target at all. It’s very nice on your target and on the head itself.

So, in essence it makes the actual broadhead a practice head, and is easy to pull out of the target. Just be sure that when you hunt, you have removed the set screw, or the blades will not deploy.

Penetration and durability testing

For my penetration and durability tests, I shot the SEVR heads through 1-2-inch layers of MDF, with a foam mat in the front. I also shot them at a 45-degree angle on the MDF. After those tests, I shot them into a steel plate.

For testing, I shot the Bowtech SR6, set at 72 pounds, on the comfort setting. The arrows I used with the heads are the Bishop Mammoth FOC King, bsecause they are the most durable arrows made. These tests really put the arrows through the ringer and yet they don’t get damaged, as they are incredibly resilient.

MDF Board Penetration Test

I shot the 1.5-inch, 125-grain head and the 1.7-inch, 100-grain head into the MDF. Both broadheads penetrated all the way through the first board and then stopped into the second board.

In the back of the second layer of MDF, the 1.7-inch bulged out a little bit. The 1.5-inch bulged out quite a bit more.

On the entrance hole, both deployed upon impact even with the soft pad over the first board and the cuts are exactly as advertised.

The 1.5-inch head opened up to 1.5 inches. And the 1.7-inch head opened up to 1.7 inches exactly.

45-degree angle shot into MDF

I set up two MDF boards at a 45-degree angle and shot both the 1.5 and 1.7-inch heads into it.   

Both heads penetrated precisely straight through. There was no sliding off the 45-degree angle board at all. And, the penetration was great for both of them. You see the top one was the 1.5-inch, the bottom the 1.7.

entrance holes of 1.5 and 1.7 inch sevr broadheads
Both the 1.5 and 1.7-inch SEVR heads created their respective sized entrance holes in the foam pad and MDF board.
penetration test of 1.5 and 1.7 inch sevr broadheads
Both heads penetrated into the second layer of MDF board.
1.5 and 1.7 sevrs penetrating 45-degree angled mdf
The 1.5-inch SEVR penetrated slightly better through 45-degree angled MDF board.

Steel Plate Penetration Test

Because these heads held up so well in the MDF testing, I also shot them into a steel plate to evaluate what would happen.  

I honestly wasn’t expecting them to hold up that well after all those other MDF board shots. But, they went through the steel plate and then through the second board.

You can see that the 1.5-inch at the top, blew all the way through it. And you can see the tip of the 1.7-inch, 100-grain, sticking at the bottom.

Here are the heads after going through the initial two layers of MDF and then another layer of MDF and an angle, and then a layer of steel plate and then another MDF, half inch MDF. All of them were half inch MDFs. And they both held up extremely well.

On the 1.5-inch, there was zero damage to the tip. The blades took very little damage, incurring only one nick. (The nick at the bottom is part of the design that holds the rubber bands in place.)

As for the 1.7-inch, they too held up really well, receiving small nicks both blades from the steel plate test.

Overall, the SEVR heads held up really well, including the blades, tips and ferrules.  

sevr steel plate penetration
Both the 1.5 and the 1.7-inch SEVR heads penetrated the steel plate and the first layer of MDF.

BONUS: SEVR 2.0 Ti Broadheads Review

Below I’m going to show you the results of my testing of the SEVR Ti 2.0, but first, a little history behind this head…

How the Ti 2.0 came to be

SEVR originally came out with their first broadhead, called the 2.1, which was just known as the SEVR. It had a massive 2.1 cutting diameter, and some really cool features (blades pivoting around bone and a super low profile in flight, titanium ferrule, etc.)

There was a lot I liked about that head and I did some initial testing on it when it first came out.

The only drawback that I saw in that head was that it wasn’t the best at penetration. Now, with a full 2.1-inch cut, you don’t expect it to penetrate super well, but I thought it should penetrate a bit better than it did.

So since that time, SEVR came out with the 1.7 and the 1.5, which I’ve covered above. They shortened the cut a little bit in the 1.7, and 1.5 (1.7 inches and 1.5 inches instead of 2.1). I’ve since come to love those heads. In fact, the 1.5 is one of my very favorite heads, period. It’s more durable than most fixed-blade heads and by far the most durable mechanical that I’ve ever tested. I’ve taken animals with it all over the world.

Well now, they’ve come out with another big cut model that is also supposed to maximize penetration. And that is this Ti, (Titanium) 2.0.

The SEVR Ti 2.0 compared to the old SEVR 2.1

I tested the SEVR Ti 2.0 for penetration, for edge sharpness and retention, and for durability.

I didn’t test the flight because I’ve already tested the flight of the SEVRs quite a bit and they fly exceptionally well. You can see the low profile. They just fly like a field point.

But I put it through all those other tests and I want to compare the 2.1 to the new 2.0 and see what the difference is in terms of penetration.

The SEVRs have a solid titanium ferrule that is grade 5 titanium and one piece all the way up, including the tip.

The blades are made out of a hardened 420 stainless steel at 0.032 inches thick. The blades are held in place by a little O-ring at the base that fits into that groove and when they’re shot and penetrate into the hide when they first made contact, the winged tips pushed the blades back and they deploy and lock into an open position, giving a full  cutting diameter (in this case, 2.1 inches).

sevr ti 2.0 and 2.1 differences
Here, you can see the differences between the old SEVR 2.1 and the newer SEVR Ti 2.0.

These two heads may look similar, but there are three main differences.

  • The new Ti 2.0 has a slightly smaller cut, 2.0 inches versus 2.1 on the original SEVR.
  • The blades of the Ti 2.0 have a more swept angle (less straightness) to them, so they’re going to get easier penetration.
  • The little winged tips that caused the deployment of the 2.1, they protrude a little bit farther beyond the blade than they do on the 2.0. On the 2.0, they just slightly protrude, and that increases penetration.

So, those three changes and modifications from the 2.1 to the 2.0 are supposed to result in up to 15% deeper penetration by and large. So I was eager that to the test.

SEVR Ti 2.0 sharpness test

The SEVR Ti 2.0 was still able to cut paper cuts paper after five strokes of the shaft of a carbon arrow.

sevr ti 2.0 cutting paper test
The Ti 2.0 was able to cut paper after 5 strokes of the arrow.

Ballistic Gel Penetration test comparison

I shot both the 2.1 and the Ti 2.0 into ballistic gel that was fronted by a rubber mat and 1/2″ MDF.

sevr ti 2.0 and 2.1 penetration into ballistic gel
The 2.1 penetrated 6 and 3/4 inches and the new SEVR Ti 2.0 penetrated 7 and 3/4 inches.

Ti 2.0 MDF durability test

I shot the Ti 2.0 into MDF to see how it would hold up. The results were surprising.

sevr 2.0 ti after mdf penetration test
Here’s the head after going through the MDF five times. And as you can see, it looks brand new.

Then, I decided to see how it would handle a .22 gauge steel plate.

sevr ti 2.0 after steel plate test
Here you can see the SEVR after going through the steel plate twice and after having gone through the MDF. You can see the blades got pretty bent up and yet, it held together. Pretty impressive.

One last thing I think is worth noting on the Ti 2.0… If you already have the old 2.1 heads, you can just order the blades for the 2.0 and swap them out. These can be used with the ferrule of the 2.1. So, it’s nice that you can do that. If you want to pick up some penetration from the 2.1s that you already have, just get the new blades and put them in there.

sevr ti 2.0 scorecard
Final scorecard for the SEVR Ti 2.0

SEVR Broadheads Review Conclusion

When I first heard the SEVR broadheads were hitting the market, I had a lot of hope that they penetrate well and hold up well with the changes made to the new models. These heads have exceeded my expectations.

In terms of flight, I knew they would fly extremely well. And, they fly as good as any mechanical head I’ve ever tested. They are like a field point in flight, flying right up there with the very best.

In terms of penetration, they were excellent, maintain outstanding durability as they were shot into 4 total layers of ½-inch MDF, a steel plate and foam mat.

So the SEVR 1.5 and 1.7-inch are really a good heads for bowhunters to consider for various animals.

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