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bow hunting tips picture of man with bow and arrow

Bow Hunting Tips From N1 Outdoors [So You Can Be Ready When The Moment Of Truth Comes]

Bow hunting is a fun and adventurous way to hunt wild game. Many who have experienced success at it will tell you that there’s nothing quite like it.

Whether you are looking for information on bow hunting for beginners or even a seasoned veteran, we hope to provide you with helpful bow hunting tips to help you in your quest to become a better bow hunter.

  1. Bow Maintenance
  2. Blind Bale Shooting
  3. Aim Small / Miss Small
  4. Hunting Stances
  5. Off-Season Practice

Check out the FIVE archery video tips below to get valuable information on how you can be sure you have an arrow that’s “Just Pass’N Through!”

Bow Hunting Tips: #1 – Bow Maintenance | Avoid Freak Accidents Like This One…

When you see this freak archery accident, you’ll want to learn what you can do to help prevent the possibility of it ever happening to you.

Bow hunting is more than just flinging arrows. bow maintenance checks in the off-season, as well as before your hunt, are an extremely important part of being sure you are able to bow hunt safely and avoiding injury.

In the first of our bow hunting tips, we’ve got details on how to do preventative bow maintenance, so you can avoid unnecessary accidents like this one when shooting your bow…

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Archery Accidents And How To Avoid Them

If you watched the above video, you’ll understand why bow maintenance is an important part of bow hunting.

Some of you are shooting your bow year round, but some of you put it into storage during the off season and because the temperatures can change in those environments, it’s very important to check bowstrings cables as well as your limbs before shooting.



Bow maintenance checklist [Pre-Shoot Checklist]

Here are some things you should check before you shoot your bow:

  • Be sure before every shoot that you check your strings and your cables for any signs of wear or fraying. Anything like that can be a potential for a broken string or cable during a hunt just like in the video above.
  • Be sure you check your limbs very carefully. You want to be sure there’s no signs of splintering, bubbling, or cracking. Extreme temperatures and sometimes even storage can cause limbs to weaken. And, you don’t want to have one of those limbs be damaged or break during a shoot.
  • Be sure all your screws and any bolts are tightened properly, so that you don’t have any of your accessories loose during a shoot.
  • Check your cams. Be sure you don’t have any nics or cuts that would affect your string in any way,  whether it be to cause a fraying or a cutting of the string, or else damage to a cam, where your string may actually even come off the track.
  • Be sure your rest is aligned properly.
  • Check cam rotation and be sure the cams are not warped and that they both reach letoff at the same exact time.
  • Be sure you get the proper arrow spine for your bow set up.

If you are not sure how to check the above items, we recommend you take to your local bow shop and have them look for you and inspect that, so that you can have the best chance of a safe shoot.

Tip #2 – Blind Bale Shooting [Improve Your Archery Technique]

In this N1 Minute archery tips video, learn how closing your eyes can be the best way to see results in your archery and bow hunting technique.

bow hunting tips blind bale shooting

Stand back a few feet from a large target. Draw back and locate your target. Close your eyes and shoot. This drill will help grip, form, anchor point and release techniques. Put all these techniques together N1, and you’ll be seeing the results soon.

Tip #3 – Aim Small Miss Small [Improve Your Accuracy]

In the third of our bow hunting tips videos, 3D archery tournament shooter, Cole Honstead, shows you a “small” tip that could help you BIG during hunting season!



Tip #4 – Hunting Stances Can Make Or Break A Bow Hunt [So, Know Them All!]

In the below N1 Minute archery tips video, learn about various stances that can help you in all types of bow hunting scenarios.

For those of you who have bow hunted any amount of time, you know that some things can happen during a hunt that simple target practice can’t prepare you for. The video above will show you some archery tips to help you be best prepared when your moment of truth comes.



Archery Stances For Bow Hunting

Hunting stances can be used for everything from spot and stalk hunts in the West to using blinds and tree stands in the east.

For tree stand hunting, try your best to get to the elevated position. This is as simple as finding the hill and using the bed of a pick-up.

For spot and stalk hunts, try practicing using incline and decline slopes. When shooting from a blind, you’d better get used to sitting in a chair or kneeling position.

Practicing these stances throughout the off season will give you that confidence for a shot of a lifetime.

Tip #5: Off-Season Bow Practice [You’ll Hunt Like You Practice]

In this N1 Minute, learn some bow hunting tips on how to to keep your archery skills polished and sharp during the off-season so that you can maintain proper archery form.




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Archery Practice Tips

You know for us bow hunters, this is the time of year that we practice and practice for. But what about when the season’s over? How do you keep your skills sharp?



Archery exercise for bowhunters

Here’s a simple tip to keep those muscles active after hunting season and all it takes is a simple exercise band.

So many hunters put away their bows, after the fall, through winter, until turkey season. With, one of these exercise bands, you can practice your draw cycle throughout the winter and make that first draw in the spring a little easier.

Simply grasp one end of the band with your front hand and with your drawing hand, pull the band back to your anchor point. Repeat this ten to fifteen times and then switch hands. This will work both your back and shoulders. A few sets of this draw cycle exercise a day, and you’ll be ready to hit the mark on your next 3D shoot or Spring turkey hunt.

We hope you have found our bow hunting tips to be useful in your quest to become better at your craft. We hope you have an arrow that’s Just Pass’N Through!

To view other hunting and fishing tips videos, simply click on the “videos” link in our menu.

turkey with N1 Outdoors logo

Turkey Hunting For Beginners | Starter Tips

Turkeys are a very popular animal to hunt, but even with the wild turkey’s rise in popularity, it still remains a very challenging animal for even the most experienced hunters to bag.

But even so, this guide should help beginner turkey hunters get on the path to bagging their first tom.

turkey and shotgun on truck tire

Turkeys can be an extremely tough animal to harvest, even for the seasoned hunter. Be committed to learning as much as you can before you go and in the seasons to come.

Turkey Hunting (before you go…)

Before we get to some basic turkey hunting tips, lets cover a few other important things first…

Know and Play By the Rules

Before you even bother with packing your hunting gear, take time to learn your state’s regulations on wild turkey hunting.

Can you shoot before sunrise?

Can you shoot after sunset?

If so, how long before sunrise and after sunset are you allowed to shoot?

sunrise over barley field

Knowing the hunting regulations in your state, like whether you can shoot before sunrise and after sunset, are important to know before you go turkey hunting.

Hunting seasons and bag limits in the state you are going to be hunting is also something to be aware of.

Each state declares its own seasons and bag limits for each game species. The state agency bases those decisions on science and harvest totals, as well as other factors.

Additionally, a hunter safety education may be required to buy hunting licenses, depending on the hunter’s age.



Apprentice licenses may be offered to first-time hunters in place of hunter safety education, but the new hunter must be accompanied by a properly licensed hunter before hitting the woods.

All of this type information should be answered by checking out your state’s department of natural resources website. 

Bottom line… always know the laws before you hit the woods!



Gearing Up

Wild turkeys have keen eyesight, so you will want to conceal your movements as much as possible while out hunting.

A good camo pattern for the terrain you are hunting is essential. So, make sure that whatever you wear conceals your hands, neck, and face, because a turkeys spook at the slightest movements.

n1 outdoors turkey hunter

Staying concealed on your turkey hunts is critical when turkey hunting and could be the difference between bagging a tom or coming home empty-handed.

Of course, unless you’re Chuck Norris, you won’t be bagging that turkey with your bare hands. So, you’ll need to have and be proficient with a bow or shotgun before heading to the turkey woods.

If you choose a bow, whether it be a compound, recurve, crossbow, or even a traditional archery bow, make your choice something you are comfortable shooting from a seated position, as most turkey hunts happen from the ground.



Scout, Scout, Scout

Even if you have become an expert at harvesting trophy deer or other animals, you must realize that turkeys can still be a difficult animal to hunt and kill. Heading out on a scouting trip before the big hunt can be crucial to your success.

So when it comes to scouting, knowing what to look for can help you determine if turkeys are frequenting your property and if so, where they are the most active.



Types Of Turkey Sign

Knowing what turkey sign looks like is a great start for determining if turkeys are active on the property you will be hunting. After all, you can wear camo from head to toe, put on face paint, and be as still as a statue, but if you don’t have turkeys on the land you’re hunting, well, at least you enjoyed being outside.

Here are some types of sign to look for when scouting for turkeys:

  • Turkey tracks: Tracks can certainly help you identify where a turkey has been, but you also want to figure out where it went and when, so hopefully you can intercept one on the next trip there.
  • Feathers: It might seem obvious, but turkey feathers are a great indicator that there are, or have been, turkeys in the vicinity. So keep an eye out for the feathers, especially if roosting trees are in the vicinity. You may have turkeys nearby.
  • Turkey droppings: Turkey droppings can be J-shaped (often a tom) or in a spiral shape or a “blob” (usually indicating a hen) in a variety of . But, if you find fresh droppings, that’s a good sign that a turkey is nearby.
  • Scratching: Be sure to pay close attention to the ground as you walk through wooded areas, as turkeys will scratch the ground. They do this to look for insects as well as other types of food, like acorns. Scratching can be a great clue to whether turkeys are frequenting and feeding in wooded areas on the property you will be hunting.
  • Dusting Areas: Turkeys like to roll belly down in loose soil or sand to clean their feathers and will leave behind distinct areas of disturbed terrain along logging roads or under standing pines.


Turkey Calling

To be successful in turkey hunting, many hunters rely on calling to help bring the birds within shooting range.

Calls work by replicating a wild turkey’s natural vocalization. Turkeys of all ages and genders produce various types of yelps and calls.

Box, slate, mouth, diaphragm, and locator calls (like crow and owl calls) are all different options a hunter can choose from. However, beginners usually find a box calls as one of the easier ones to get consistent sounds.

A box call is used by scraping a paddle bottom along the side of the box panel’s lip. The hollow inside chamber provides a distinct note that appeals to the birds.

Here are a few tips to remember when calling turkeys:

  • Practice, practice, practice: As a new turkey hunter, it’s important to learn basic calls like the cluck, cut and the yelp. Learn all you can about making these turkey vocalizations as life-like as possible.
  • Get real: Turkeys aren’t all that different from people in that they don’t always sound exactly the same. Mix in some varying cadences in your calling. There’s nothing more unnatural (or annoying) than a “turkey” that makes the exact same sound for the same amount of time, every single time it calls. Turkeys can be extremely wary, so don’t let your calling be one of the reasons. Mix things up.
  • Keep it short: Keep your call series brief. You won’t be able to hear a tom gobble in response in you are yelping your head off! Listening is as important as calling, so keep thing short and stayed tuned in.
  • That’s it, nice and soft: If you notice that you have a tom’s attention with your calling, don’t keep calling at the same volume. Change your calling to softer clucks and purrs and see if you can smooth-talk him into range.
  • Sometimes less is more: Turkeys will be wary if you call too much, so make sure not to call too often. Sometimes the best thing to do after calling is not to call again. A tom may get worried that his mate-in-waiting has decided to leave and he’ll want to find her!


Turkey Hunting With Decoys

Another way to attract turkeys is by using a decoy. Turkeys are territorial, so if a gobbler happens to see a hen decoy or another jake or tom infringing on their territory, he is sure to take notice.

turkey hunting decoys

There are many price ranges of turkey hunting decoys on the market. Spend the extra money to get the most realistic ones you can afford.

When turkey hunting with decoys, here are a few tips that are helpful to know:

  • Decoy transportation: Be sure to carry your decoys head down in a bag. In the event another hunter is in your area and thinks the decoys are real turkeys, it could lead to a terrible injury or even death. Safety first!
  • Use a hen and a jake decoy: A gobbler will be attracted to a hen, (and mad if it sees a young male turkey trying to steal his girl!)
  • Close but not too close: Be sure your decoys are close enough so that if a tom gets hung up on the far side of them, he is still close enough to shoot and kill. But, they also need to be far enough away so that your gun’s shot pattern can open up. Setting up decoys at about 15 yards is a good rule of thumb.
  • Placement is key: When setting up your decoys, ask yourself, “could a turkey see these from a long way off?” If the answer is no, then consider repositioning. The last thing you want is to call and have a tom come in and not see what he was looking for and leave… heartbreak city! Setting up your decoys in the open will also allow other hunters to identify them as decoys, so that they don’t attempt to shoot in your direction.
  • Don’t skimp: If you’ve walked the hunting aisles at your local sporting good store, you have probably noticed that there are are many different brands of turkey decoys (and several price points). Get the most realistic you can for your money. A life-like decoy could be the difference between getting that tom in close enough to shoot and watching him run off to be hunted another day. Spend the money and get good decoys.


Sit, hide or run…

There is more than one method of hunting for turkeys. Let’s briefly cover those.

Camp out at the base of a tree

If you have the ability to be very still, you might try sitting at the base of a tree as you wait for Mr. Tom Turkey to pay you a visit.

If so, try to find a large tree that is larger than shoulder width. A wider tree base will help conceal your shape better than a thinner tree.

two turkey hunters in camo

Believe it or not, you don’t have to hunt from a blind for turkeys. But, you do need to be concealed well with camo and natural cover and be able to stay very still.

Also, be sure you have appropriate camo for the area/habitat you are hunting. Wear a face mask as well. Turkeys can see very well, so take the extra effort to sit still and stay concealed.



Turkey Blind Hunting

Many hunters use blinds to hunt for deer, but you can turkey hunt from them too.

If you are fairly certain of a tom’s presence in the area, and have an idea of where he is going to be, and you want to sit moderately comfortably while you wait, a blind may be a good option.

ground box blind on sloped

Ground blind hunting can work well in clearings, field edges and ridges and is a good option if hunting with youngsters.

Turkey blinds are also a good option if you are hunting with kids. It’s a little easier to get away with movement if you are in a blind. So, if you or the youngsters are a little fidgety, a blind might be a good option.

Even if you are hunting from a blind, it’s still a good idea to wear dark clothing and a mask or face paint that will blend into the darkness of the inside of the blind.

You can set up your blind on a field edge or ridge. Blinds can work great when using decoys as well.



Run and Gun

When it comes to turkey hunting, “running and gunning” can be a very exciting and effective way to bag a gobbler.

Basically, it means that a hunter will not be stationary, as if he/she were in a blind or sitting at the base of a tree. Rather, the hunter will try to locate turkeys by walking short distances, watching, calling, and listening for turkeys.

So, if the hunter calls and hears a gobble, the next step is to try and pinpoint the location of the tom and get as close as possible and get set-up in order (at the base of a tree, for example) to make a good shot on the bird.

cameraman turkey hunting

“Running and gunning” for turkeys is quite the rush, but can leave you scrambling to find adequate cover that is close enough to get a shot on a tom.

Much like hunting from the base of a tree, you need to use the available natural cover and also be sure to wear as much camo clothing as possible, including face mask/paint, camo shoes/boots, etc.

Once you have located a tom, be sure to set up where you will have a shooting lane toward the bird’s expected travel path. It’s important to always be sure of where you are aiming and shooting.

If you cannot clearly identify the bird, do not shoot. Never shoot into brush or an area where you cannot clearly see the target. Safety first!

Get Out And Go!

Hopefully these turkey hunting tips will help you progress from a beginner into a seasoned and successful turkey hunter.

Best of luck in bagging a tom!

view while sighting in riflescope view
Richard Douglas, founder and editor of Scopes Field, and a columnist at The National Interest, 1945, Daily Caller and other publications.
g5 deadmeat broadhead

G5 Deadmeat Broadheads Review | The Inside Information

In this review, I tested a mechanical called the G5 DeadMeat broadheads.

Right off the bat, I was very impressed by the design. First of all, it’s a 3-blade head and it has a cutting diameter (when blades are fully depoloyed) of 1 and 1/2 inches, which is nice.

That cutting diameter is perfect for whitetail deer, turkey, smaller hogs, and so forth.

I’m typically a fixed blade guy, but I’m constantly looking at the latest and greatest broadheads, and always willing to try some new mechanicals.

The G5 Deadmeat broadhead at first glance

g5 deadmeat broadhead in closed position
I like the configuration of the blades on this head. As you can see, it’s really stout. It has a super short profile, and when the blades are in the closed position, it’s very small.
g5 deadmeat in deployed position
This is the G5 DeadMeat in the deployed position.

Flight

These heads fly incredibly well. They come with a ballistic match point which looks just like the regular head’s shape that’s basically a practice head. It flies just like the regular head would fly.

They are also  extremely forgiving. Now, I realize that a lot of heads fly very well. My bow is really well-tuned. I can pop balloons with fixed blades out to a 100 yards, but this is on the extra forgiving side for sure. So, I love that.




Head Construction

On the downside, I don’t like that it’s just a metal injection molding. I’m not a huge fan of that. It’s still good, and it’s better than a lot of aluminum heads, but it’s not as good as machined heads (of course, it would cost a lot more if it were a machined).

However, it is still a solid steel and it has a two-piece ferrule. It is a few different composite pieces of steel, but it is, in essence, 100% steel.

g5 deadmeat broadhead components
The DeadMeat also has a cool retaining clip that is replaceable, which allows the blades to lock in place. When they lock in place, they make a little snap sound. I like this much more than a rubber band. I also like it more than the retaining clip that Rage uses, where you’re hoping it’s really in there, but it doesn’t have that little dimple to lock it in place. This blade should not come apart when they’re bumped and they shouldn’t come apart in flight at all. I also like that it’s also a solid steel construction. That’s a big plus. Everything is steel.

In the first test, I shot the DeadMeat through a 3/8” piece of plywood. This is my favorite thing to do with mechanical broadheads, so that I can see how well they deploy upon entrance. It also helps me see how well they penetrate and hold up to the plywood. In many ways, it’s similar in consistency to bone.

If they don’t hold up to plywood then I’m not going to be hunting with them for sure.

So let’s see what happened with the DeadMeat in the 3/8-inch plywood.



In the testing, I used a footed Hexx 330 arrow with a total weight of 500 grains and I shot it out of a Hoyt Carbon Spyder 30 at 73 lbs.

Plywood penetration test

After shooting into the plywood, the blades were not near as sharp. So, they dulled significantly such as metal injection molded blades will often do.

blade deployment of deadmeat in plywood
The blades fully deployed on impact. However, while two of them deployed all the way, one did not have deployed quite as much. That’s interesting. Maybe because it was going with the grain of the plywood.
back of plywood after deadmeat penetration
On the other side of the plywood, you can see it certainly made a nice hole. Penetration was very good.
deadmeat bent blade
Although the blades dulled after the plywood test, they did, however, hold up remarkably well. The only problems was that one of the blades had a little bit of a bend to it.


Something to watch for

I have known someone who had one of the three heads in his pack that had blades that would not deploy at all. Upon further inspection, he found that there is a groove that the blades slide up and down in.

This groove can contain small burrs, which is what was preventing his blades from opening. He talked to G5 about it, and of course, they replaced them. But, that would be something to test before you shoot them to be sure the blades are sliding and opening effectively. 




G5 Deadmeat Broadheads | Final Thoughts

These heads have good durability. I’m impressed with that. They have a really good cutting diameter size for a 3-blade and it will really make a nice hole.  

In addition, flight is extremely good. You should always have a well-tuned bow. But, this head would be extremely forgiving, even with a bow that is not optimally tuned.

deadmeat blade angle
The only thing that is a little concerning is the blade angle. You can see here that it is really steep when the blades are fully deployed; it’s almost horizontal. Because of that, it won’t get as good of penetration as if the blade angle were more streamlined. Although that is somewhat of a concern, I don’t believe it would be a problem at all with deer, smaller hogs, or turkeys. So, if that’s what you are hunting, I think this could be a winner of a broadhead.

While this head would not be my first choice on an elk (those bones can be really tough, and I would want to be sure to use a fixed blade head on an animal like that), I’m sure it would take an elk if you hit it in the right place.

But, it would be great for hunting whitetail deer, turkey and small hogs.

Overall, I give this head a thumbs-up.

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