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sevr 1.5 and 1.7 inch broadheads

Sevr Broadheads Review | What You Need To Know

-By John Lusk

In this broadhead review, I tested broadheads from SEVR; The SEVR 1.5, 1.7, 2.1 and Ti 2.0.

SEVR Broadhead Offerings

SEVR originally came out with a broadhead that had a 2.1” cutting diameter. It was a great head with fantastic flight and it was tough. But, the penetration is about what you would expect from a 2.1” broadhead and it was a bit lacking in kinetic energy for my purposes.  

For a deer, or even for smaller game like turkey, if your number one goal is a big hole, the 2.1” SEVR is going to deliver. But to round out their lineup, they’ve come up with two additional offerings.

sevr broadheads 15. and 1.7 inch diagram
The 1.5-inch and 1.7-inch SEVR broadheads look the same in shape, but with some subtle differences in head and ferrule composition.

SEVR 1.7-inch Broadhead

To compliment their original broadhead, SEVR introduced a 1.7” head. It has a stainless steel tip and it has got a good grade aluminum ferrule. It has rear deploying blades that lock in place, which I love.

The 1.7” cutting diameter provides decent penetration and is a good all-around broadhead offering for pretty much any kind of game.

SEVR 1.5-inch Broadhead

SEVR also introduced the 1.5-inch head. The 1.5-inch operates just like the 2.1-inch with a few design differences.

On the 1.7-inch head, the tip is not quite as big as the 1.5-inch head and also has a smaller ferrule.  The 1.7-inch head only comes in a 100-grain and is a little cheaper, while the 1.5-inch head comes in a 100-grain as well as a 125-grain.

SEVR 1.5-inch and 1.7-inch heads | The details…

Firstly, just as the name implies, the 1.5-inch head has a 1.5-inch cutting diameter. Also, the ferrule and tip on the 1.5-inch head are titanium, as opposed to the stainless steel tip and aluminum ferrule of its 2.1-inch predecessor.

The blades of the 1.5-inch head are stainless steel and lock into place just like the 2.1-inch head.

The 1.5-inch head is designed for big-bodied, heavy-skinned animals. It is also better for longer distance shots, due to the smaller cutting diameter.

Although the cut is 1.5” wide, the chiseled tip itself is approximately 5/16-inch wide. So, with the 1.5-inch width cut in one direction and the 5/16-inch wide tip cut in the other direction, you get a total of a little over 1-3/4 inches of cut with a 1-1/2-inch hole.  

Pricing

SEVR has a direct-to consumer approach, so you can only order them from their website. You can purchase them by the eaches, but you can get a better deal if you buy higher quantities.

At the time of this article’s publishing, the 1.7-heads are $11.99 each. The 1.5-inch head is $13.99. The 1.5 is more expensive due to the titanium head. You can purchase at SEVRbroadheads.com

Using code LUSKFIVE will give you $5 off any order at SEVRbroadheads.com!

Blades and cutting features

I love the way the SEVRs work. They have two small “wings” that are exposed during flight. When they come in contact with an animal, they actually “pre-stretch” the hide (skin) as the blades deploy. In theory, since the blades are rear-deploying, not only do you get a 4-cut entry, but you get a bigger cut.  



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The heads of the SEVRs also lock into place. So, unlike a lot of mechanical heads that can close down if there’s not a certain amount of pressure, these heads lock in place and they stay that way in the animal.

Because they lock in place, they will not give a smaller cut than they do at their full deployment. The blades will go back into pre-deployment position when removing from the animal, but will still lock back down in deployment position.

If you’ve ever shot a broadhead into a deer or other animal and hit bone, it typically deflects off course. But, the great thing about the SEVRs is that the will rotate to one side if they come they come into contact with bone or a hard medium like a rib. The blade will simply fall to the side that encounters the bone, allowing the other blade to continue cutting and still keeps the broadhead on track.

This feature helps increase the chances of getting a good exit and getting better penetration of lungs and other vitals when the head encounters bone. And, because the blades stay locked even as they rotate, they just “dance” around the bone.

sevr blade rotation

SEVR blades will rotate when coming in contact with bone or other hard surfaces, which helps prevent bending and breaking of blades and keeps heads on course.

Another nice feature to the SEVR broadheads is that when there is heavy pressure on the blades – the type of pressure that might bend or break both blades – they compressed ever so slightly to absorb some of that impact. Because of this feature, they are difficult to break.



Blade Thickness

The 1.7-inch heads have a blade thickness of 0.035-inch thick. The 1.5-inch heads have blades that are 0.032-inch thick. Both heads have all the same features, locking in place and pivoting around bone, staying on track.

I was excited that they came out with a 1.7 and came out with a 1.5 because the 2.1-inch was just a little bit much for me to be able to be confident that I would be able to get a pass-through on an animal.

Although I knew I would get a big hole, I needed to be confident that I would get pass throughs. And, when hunting large animals like elk or bear, I want to be sure I get deep penetration.  

Blade angle and overall cut

Another thing I like about the 1.5-inch head versus the original 2.1-inch head is that the blade angle is much less. So, penetration is not only better because of a smaller cutting area, but it’s also better because of the smaller angle.

The same with the 1.7-inch head. While it has a slightly larger cutting angle than the 1.5, it is still less than the 2.1. So, the 1.7 also gets better penetration, not only because of the angle, but because of the smaller diameter cut.  

Now, you might think, “Oh, 1.5 or 1.7 inches is kind of small.” But, there are not many fixed heads that have a 1.5-inch cut. They might have a combined 2-inch cut, with 1-inch one way and 1-inch the other way. But, what I have found with broadheads on game animals is that the wider a cut, the more effective bloodletting you will get.

On three and four-blade broadheads, although you may get more total tissue cut, you get a smaller cutting diameter. And, smaller holes tend to get plugged up easier with organs blood and tissue, resulting in less effective blood trails.

But, when you get a wider cut, even like a 1.5-inch, the hide and wound tend to stretch open as the animal moves, producing better bloodletting. Of course, with the 1.7, you would get even more. With the 2.1-inch head, you’re going to get a lot of bloodletting, but you are going to compromise penetration to do so.  

So, with the new SEVR lineup, you have something for everyone. But, what I really wanted to see was… how do they fly? They are really the same heads, so I just tested the 1.5-inch.  



SEVR flight

sevr broadhead in target
The SEVRs fly just like a field point, providing great accuracy, even at long distances.

When it comes to target shooting the SEVR heads, there is a feature that helps them stand out. Each head comes with a small set screw, so that when you shoot, the head stays in a closed position. Because the blades do not deploy, they don’t touch the target at all. It’s very nice on your target and on the head itself.

So, in essence it makes the actual broadhead a practice head, and is easy to pull out of the target. Just be sure that when you hunt, you have removed the set screw, or the blades will not deploy.

Penetration and durability testing

For my penetration and durability tests, I shot the SEVR heads through 1-2-inch layers of MDF, with a foam mat in the front. I also shot them at a 45-degree angle on the MDF. After those tests, I shot them into a steel plate.

For testing, I shot the Bowtech SR6, set at 72 pounds, on the comfort setting. The arrows I used with the heads are the Bishop Mammoth FOC King, bsecause they are the most durable arrows made. These tests really put the arrows through the ringer and yet they don’t get damaged, as they are incredibly resilient.

MDF Board Penetration Test

I shot the 1.5-inch, 125-grain head and the 1.7-inch, 100-grain head into the MDF. Both broadheads penetrated all the way through the first board and then stopped into the second board.

In the back of the second layer of MDF, the 1.7-inch bulged out a little bit. The 1.5-inch bulged out quite a bit more.

On the entrance hole, both deployed upon impact even with the soft pad over the first board and the cuts are exactly as advertised.

The 1.5-inch head opened up to 1.5 inches. And the 1.7-inch head opened up to 1.7 inches exactly.

45-degree angle shot into MDF

I set up two MDF boards at a 45-degree angle and shot both the 1.5 and 1.7-inch heads into it.   

Both heads penetrated precisely straight through. There was no sliding off the 45-degree angle board at all. And, the penetration was great for both of them. You see the top one was the 1.5-inch, the bottom the 1.7.

entrance holes of 1.5 and 1.7 inch sevr broadheads
Both the 1.5 and 1.7-inch SEVR heads created their respective sized entrance holes in the foam pad and MDF board.
penetration test of 1.5 and 1.7 inch sevr broadheads
Both heads penetrated into the second layer of MDF board.
1.5 and 1.7 sevrs penetrating 45-degree angled mdf
The 1.5-inch SEVR penetrated slightly better through 45-degree angled MDF board.

Steel Plate Penetration Test

Because these heads held up so well in the MDF testing, I also shot them into a steel plate to evaluate what would happen.  

I honestly wasn’t expecting them to hold up that well after all those other MDF board shots. But, they went through the steel plate and then through the second board.

You can see that the 1.5-inch at the top, blew all the way through it. And you can see the tip of the 1.7-inch, 100-grain, sticking at the bottom.

Here are the heads after going through the initial two layers of MDF and then another layer of MDF and an angle, and then a layer of steel plate and then another MDF, half inch MDF. All of them were half inch MDFs. And they both held up extremely well.

On the 1.5-inch, there was zero damage to the tip. The blades took very little damage, incurring only one nick. (The nick at the bottom is part of the design that holds the rubber bands in place.)

As for the 1.7-inch, they too held up really well, receiving small nicks both blades from the steel plate test.

Overall, the SEVR heads held up really well, including the blades, tips and ferrules.  

sevr steel plate penetration
Both the 1.5 and the 1.7-inch SEVR heads penetrated the steel plate and the first layer of MDF.

BONUS: SEVR 2.0 Ti Broadheads Review

Below I’m going to show you the results of my testing of the SEVR Ti 2.0, but first, a little history behind this head…

How the Ti 2.0 came to be

SEVR originally came out with their first broadhead, called the 2.1, which was just known as the SEVR. It had a massive 2.1 cutting diameter, and some really cool features (blades pivoting around bone and a super low profile in flight, titanium ferrule, etc.)

There was a lot I liked about that head and I did some initial testing on it when it first came out.

The only drawback that I saw in that head was that it wasn’t the best at penetration. Now, with a full 2.1-inch cut, you don’t expect it to penetrate super well, but I thought it should penetrate a bit better than it did.

So since that time, SEVR came out with the 1.7 and the 1.5, which I’ve covered above. They shortened the cut a little bit in the 1.7, and 1.5 (1.7 inches and 1.5 inches instead of 2.1). I’ve since come to love those heads. In fact, the 1.5 is one of my very favorite heads, period. It’s more durable than most fixed-blade heads and by far the most durable mechanical that I’ve ever tested. I’ve taken animals with it all over the world.

Well now, they’ve come out with another big cut model that is also supposed to maximize penetration. And that is this Ti, (Titanium) 2.0.

The SEVR Ti 2.0 compared to the old SEVR 2.1

I tested the SEVR Ti 2.0 for penetration, for edge sharpness and retention, and for durability.

I didn’t test the flight because I’ve already tested the flight of the SEVRs quite a bit and they fly exceptionally well. You can see the low profile. They just fly like a field point.

But I put it through all those other tests and I want to compare the 2.1 to the new 2.0 and see what the difference is in terms of penetration.

The SEVRs have a solid titanium ferrule that is grade 5 titanium and one piece all the way up, including the tip.

The blades are made out of a hardened 420 stainless steel at 0.032 inches thick. The blades are held in place by a little O-ring at the base that fits into that groove and when they’re shot and penetrate into the hide when they first made contact, the winged tips pushed the blades back and they deploy and lock into an open position, giving a full  cutting diameter (in this case, 2.1 inches).

sevr ti 2.0 and 2.1 differences
Here, you can see the differences between the old SEVR 2.1 and the newer SEVR Ti 2.0.

These two heads may look similar, but there are three main differences.

  • The new Ti 2.0 has a slightly smaller cut, 2.0 inches versus 2.1 on the original SEVR.
  • The blades of the Ti 2.0 have a more swept angle (less straightness) to them, so they’re going to get easier penetration.
  • The little winged tips that caused the deployment of the 2.1, they protrude a little bit farther beyond the blade than they do on the 2.0. On the 2.0, they just slightly protrude, and that increases penetration.

So, those three changes and modifications from the 2.1 to the 2.0 are supposed to result in up to 15% deeper penetration by and large. So I was eager that to the test.

SEVR Ti 2.0 sharpness test

The SEVR Ti 2.0 was still able to cut paper cuts paper after five strokes of the shaft of a carbon arrow.

sevr ti 2.0 cutting paper test
The Ti 2.0 was able to cut paper after 5 strokes of the arrow.

Ballistic Gel Penetration test comparison

I shot both the 2.1 and the Ti 2.0 into ballistic gel that was fronted by a rubber mat and 1/2″ MDF.

sevr ti 2.0 and 2.1 penetration into ballistic gel
The 2.1 penetrated 6 and 3/4 inches and the new SEVR Ti 2.0 penetrated 7 and 3/4 inches.

Ti 2.0 MDF durability test

I shot the Ti 2.0 into MDF to see how it would hold up. The results were surprising.

sevr 2.0 ti after mdf penetration test
Here’s the head after going through the MDF five times. And as you can see, it looks brand new.

Then, I decided to see how it would handle a .22 gauge steel plate.

sevr ti 2.0 after steel plate test
Here you can see the SEVR after going through the steel plate twice and after having gone through the MDF. You can see the blades got pretty bent up and yet, it held together. Pretty impressive.

One last thing I think is worth noting on the Ti 2.0… If you already have the old 2.1 heads, you can just order the blades for the 2.0 and swap them out. These can be used with the ferrule of the 2.1. So, it’s nice that you can do that. If you want to pick up some penetration from the 2.1s that you already have, just get the new blades and put them in there.

sevr ti 2.0 scorecard
Final scorecard for the SEVR Ti 2.0


SEVR Broadheads Review Conclusion

When I first heard the SEVR broadheads were hitting the market, I had a lot of hope that they penetrate well and hold up well with the changes made to the new models. These heads have exceeded my expectations.

In terms of flight, I knew they would fly extremely well. And, they fly as good as any mechanical head I’ve ever tested. They are like a field point in flight, flying right up there with the very best.

In terms of penetration, they were excellent, maintain outstanding durability as they were shot into 4 total layers of ½-inch MDF, a steel plate and foam mat.

So the SEVR 1.5 and 1.7-inch are really a good heads for bowhunters to consider for various animals.

gravedigger hybrid broadhead

Gravedigger Broadheads Review | The Inside Information

In this review, I’m going to be covering a broadhead that has been around for a while. It’s one I’ve actually used in the field quite a bit and been fairly successful with. It’s called the Gravedigger.

The Gravedigger Hybrid broadhead overview

Let’s take a look at the design and some of the features of the Gravedigger Hybrid head (it’s called a “hybrid” because it has both fixed and mechanical blades). Then, I’ll show you how it performed when I put it through my standard array of tests.

gravedigger hybrid broadhead in closed position
Here is the Gravedigger hybrid in the closed position.
gravedigger hybrid broadhead chisel tip
This Gravedigger hybrid model has the chisel tip. (They also make a cut on contact tip where the fixed blades extend all the way up to the top).

The cutting diameter of the Gravedigger Hybrid’s fixed blades is 1 inch. In the closed position, the mechanical blades are ½-inch. So, just in the closed position, if the blades were not to open at all, it would be an inch and 1/2 of a cut, which is no slouch of a cut.

But the mechanical blades do open. They open really well, in fact. They’re not held in place by an O-ring or a retention clip, but rather just by friction, and that’s adjustable with a small Allen bolt.

The cutting diameter in the open position here is a full 1 and 3/4 inches. So, 1 and 3/4″ by 1″ – that’s a lot of cut!
adjustable friction screw on gravedigger broadhead
You can adjust the tension that holds the blades in place. But, when they encounter a medium, they open over the top and they fall back into their fully opened position.

Gravedigger Blade specs

The blades of the Gravedigger are made out of a 416 stainless steel. The ferrule is a 7075 aluminum. It’s a pretty vented blade, but it’s still is a good stout aluminum, and the tip is a hardened steel, really stout, chisel tip.

I couldn’t find any information listing the blade thickness, so I used my micrometer to measure. The fixed blade measured 0.039 inches thick and the mechanical blades were 0.032 inches thick.

Gravedigger broadheads testing

I was eager to see how this head performed in my tests. I did not test it for long range flight, because I know it flies really well.

I consider it like a mechanical in terms of flight in the closed position, and I don’t test mechanicals for long range flight, because they all fly really well, even though this head has the little one inch fixed blade. I know it flies fantastic.

I tested for edge sharpness and retention, for penetration, and for durability.

Let’s see how the Gravedigger performed.

Sharpness Test

The Gravedigger cut paper after four strokes of the arrow.

carbon arrow shaft dulling the gravedigger hybrid
I use strokes of carbon shaft arrow to dull the blades. I want to see if they can still cut paper after each stroke.
gravedigger broadhead paper cut test
The Gravedigger was able to cut paper after four strokes of the arrow.

Ballistic Gel Penetration Test

The Gravedigger penetrated 6 and 1/4 inches through the foam and ballistic gel.

gravedigger ballistic gel penetration
The Gravedigger penetrated 6-1/4″ into the ballistic gel.
entry hole of gravedigger broadhead in ballistic gel test
Here’s the entrance of the Gravedigger. And you can see that the mechanical blades opened almost 1-3/4″ on impact. That bottom blade for whatever reason deployed a bit more effectively than the top blade. But, both of them opened up quite well for an over the top mechanical.

MDF penetration test

I shot the Gravedigger through MDF five times. Below are the pictures.

I shot the first one in the closed position and the baldes didn’t open very much. But, then on the following shots, I kept the head in the open position when I was shooting, just to test durability.

gravedigger hybrid after going through MDF
Here, you can see the Gravedigger after going through a half inch MDF five times. As you can see, it held up relatively well. The tip is in still in great shape. The ferrule is also in great shape. The fixed blades are in perfect shape. And the mechanical blades also did really well. They didn’t break off.
bent blades on gravedigger broadhead after going through mdf
Now, in terms of a bend, they did bend backwards a bit. The original on the left gives you a frame of reference. After the shots, there is quite a bit of arch to the expandable blades. But you know what? If you’re going to have a problem with the head kind of “failing,” that’s the way to do it. It’s not really a fail, because it’s continuing to cut even after going through this MDF five times. So, if there’s going to be any kind of a problem, to bend in that direction is the way to go. So overall, very impressive.

Final Thoughts

So, what do you think of the Gravedigger?

Going through these tests reminded me why I liked it so much when I first started using it way back.

There are just so many heads. It’s hard to keep using just one. I’m a broadhead junkie and like to keep trying new things!

But, this is definitely a broadhead that’s worth a look. There are some weaknesses to it but there are a lot of strengths to it as well.

So, check out the score sheet below and see what you think about it, and decide if these broadheads are the right heads for you.

gravedigger hybrid scorecard
Gravedigger Hybrid score card.
muzzy trocar header image

Muzzy Trocar Broadheads Review | The Inside Information

In this review, I took an in-depth look at the Muzzy Trocar broadheads.

I know, the Muzzy Trocar head is not new. It has been around for a long time, and I’ve used it in some of my other tests, but I’ve never done a comprehensive test on it alone. So, that’s what I did.

Muzzy Trocar design specs

The Muzzy Trocar and it’s a pretty cool-looking head. And as you can see, it has a short overall profile, which is going to aid in flight.

muzzy trocar short profile
The Muzzy Trocar is all steel and has a short overall profile.
muzzy trocar offset blades
The Trocar has offset blades in a right helical pattern, which helps aid in rotation, making them more accurate.

It also has offset blades. In the above picture, you can see that the blades are arranged in a right helical offset pattern, which helps with rotation and aids in flight, keeping them more accurate, due to a spinning effect.

And, then within the animal or any medium it hits, the blades will continue to rotate. It’s going to create a decent wound channel inside the deer or other animal as well.

The ferrule of the Trocar is one-piece construction of steel, with a really nice, small, but stout tip.

muzzy trocar 1-piece ferrule
The Muzzy Trocar has an all-steel, 1-piece ferrule.

The blades are all steel as well and they’re 0.035 inches thick, with a cutting diameter of 1-3/16 inches.

So, it provides a pretty decent size cut, just one 1/16 of an inch bigger than the standard 1-1/8 inch cut. This head is 100 grains.

Now, another thing about them is they have a 3-point blade retention system. The blades are held in place at three different points just to make sure that you don’t lose a blade, even on hard impacts.

They have a nylon washer at the bottom just to help secure them snuggly to your arrow.

Performance tests

I was eager to put these to the test. I tested them for long range flight, edge sharpness, edge retention, for penetration, and durability.

As always, in these tests, I used my Bowtech SR6 set at 72 pounds. I used Bishop Archery FOC King Arrows in 460 grains.

All right. Let’s see how the Muzzy Trocar performs.

Long-range flight

the Muzzy Trocars flew great at 70 yards. I was able to pop a balloon with no problem.

Out of the box sharpness test

In the out-of the box sharpness test, the Trocar was able to cut paper after five strokes of an arrow shaft. And, I will add that by the way they cut the paper, they are some of the sharpest blades that I’ve ever tested.

out of the box sharpness test on muzzy trocar
In the out of the box sharpenss test, the Muzzy Trocar sharpness was quite impressive. It was about to still cut paper after 5 strokes of the arrow shaft and were some of the sharpest blades I’ve tested to this point.
stroking an arrow shaft on muzzy trocar
I use a carbon arrow shaft in my sharpness test to dull the blade, in order to see how many strokes of the arrow a broadhead can take and still cut paper. I use a maximum of 5 strokes, which the Trocar was able to handle and still cut the paper.

Ballistic Gel Penetration Test

I shot the Muzzy Trocar through ballistic gel to test penetration. The Trocar penetrated 9 inches, which is pretty impressive penetration. See picture below.

muzzy trocar penetrating ballistic gel
Muzzy Trocar penetration in ballistic gel… 9 inches.

Steel plate test

In the steel plate test, I shot the Muzzy Trocar through .22 gauge steel plate five times.

As for the holes themselves, you can see below that it really does make three “slits” rather than three big triangles.

You get a little bit of an extra curl because of the offset blades, but it’s not the most impressive wound channel compared to some others like the Exodus broadheads. (That one opens up much more of a triangular hole than it does three slits). But, in terms of durability, the Trocar did very well.

muzzy trocar after steel plate test
Here’s the Trocar after going through the steel plate five times. And, as you can see, it held up really well. Two of the blades did remarkably well, but this third one got pretty dinged up. But again, that’s after several shots. And the tip was in great shape. Of course the ferrule is in great shape. It still spins true.

Muzzy Trocar broadheads review | Final Thoughts

So what do you think of the Muzzy Trocar?

I’ve got to say, it’s a performer.

I know this head has been around for awhile, and it can easily be overlooked by many, with all of the new heads that are coming out. But, this head definitely has a lot going for it.

This is a pretty stout head.

It flew fantastic. It penetrated really well, made a nice wound channel, and held up pretty well.

So, check out the scorecard below and see how it compares to other similar heads like this and see if it’s the right head for you on your next deer hunt.

muzzy trocar scorecard
This is the final scorecard for the Muzzy Trocar.

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