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mechanical broadheads pre test

Broadheads | Selecting The Right One For Your Hunt

It wasn’t long ago that broadhead selection was a fairly simple process… There just weren’t that many options available.

Well, those days are gone. Now there are a plethora of choices due to so many different design variables.

There are broadheads with 2 blades, 3 blades and 4 blades.

Then there are single bevel edges and double bevel edges, chisel tips and cut on contact tips.

There are mechanical broadheads that deploy from the rear as well as those that deploy over the top.

There are hybrids (both fixed and mechanical in the same head), stainless steels, tool steels, aluminum, and titanium all of various grades and properties.

There are cutting diameters ranging from under one inch to over three inches and total head lengths of under one inch to over three inches and blade thicknesses of .020” to .080”.

And, of course, prices ranging from one dollar per head to one hundred dollars per head… and so much more.

Expandable or fixed blades? Keep Reading! Fixed blade AND mechanical broadheads reviews videos are also further down the page!

So, bow hunters, how in the world do you make sense of it all? All the choices out there can make even an advanced bow hunter feel like a beginner. How do you know which heads are the best choices for you?

Know Thy Broadheads

broadheads thoughts pic
Be sure that you choose a broadhead that will fly accurately at your maximum range.

While almost any head on the market today can “get the job done” with a good shot, it is still important to make sure you are using the right head for your bow and the game you are pursuing. After all the time, energy, and money you’ve invested in practice and preparation, your broadhead is where the “rubber meets the road.”

A little research and education can go a long way in making sure you are not disappointed after that hard earned shot. You will notice that I have provided some recommendations for broadheads throughout this article. This is certainly not an exhaustive list, but I have personally tested each of these heads and found them to be among the best.

Fundamentally, you must keep in mind what really matters in a broadhead. Regardless of the brand and the design, there are four crucial factors that really matter.

Flight

A broadhead should provide you with absolute confidence in its flight. Consider what your maximum range is and make sure you choose a head that will fly accurately at that distance—even with some wind, a racing heart rate, and shooting while a little off balance.

Always make sure your bow is very well tuned (get help from a pro shop if you’re unsure) and you have the correct arrow spine for your bow’s poundage and draw length. Also, make sure the arrow spins true when the head is installed. You can spin it on your hand or on a table to confirm there is zero wobble to it.

Furthermore, the smaller the overall profile of the broadhead, in length and width, the more forgiving it will be in flight. This is why mechanicals are often a good choice for long distance shots.

Keys: Lower profile (shorter and narrower) = Better Flight
Truer Spin = Better Flight

Edge Retention

A broadhead should be be sharp and able to hold that sharpness after impact. How sharp it feels before it hits an animal doesn’t matter nearly as much as how sharp it is after it penetrates that first inch or two of hide, bone, and tissue. If the edge chips or bends, it will not cut and penetrate effectively. This is why blades should be thick enough, and the steel strong enough, to hold their edge well. Higher quality Tool Steels like 41L40, S7, and A2 shine in this arena.

Keys: Thicker Blades = Better Edge Retention
Higher Quality Steel = Better Edge Retention

Ferrule Strength

The ferrule of a broadhead must be able to withstand great force upon impact. I have had multiple heads, both fixed and mechanical, bend or break at the ferrule upon impacting an animal. That almost always spells disaster for a hunt. Quality materials and solid construction make a big difference. The shorter, thicker, and higher quality the material of the ferrule, the better it will stay in tact. I prefer high quality steel ferrules over titanium and aluminum for this reason.

Keys: Shorter, thicker ferrules = stronger ferrules
Higher quality steel Ferrules = Stronger Ferrules

Cut Size

A broadhead must have sufficient cut size to cause great tissue destruction while still ensuring deep penetration. With any animal I shoot at, my goal is to get as wide of a cut as possible while still providing a good likelihood of a pass through. Two holes will almost always provide a better blood trail than one hole. Given equal penetration, a wider diameter cut will slice through more tissue than a smaller diameter cut.

In the past, I used a head with a cutting diameter of one inch and always got a pass through. However, I knew I could cut more tissue and still get a pass through. So I increased the size of the cutting diameter of my broadheads, with great results. Likewise, I have used a broadhead with a very wide diameter cut and gotten poor penetration and no pass through. Finding that sweet spot between the two extremes is my goal.

Dead Ringer broadheads exit wound
A Dead Ringer Broadhead exit wound through three ribs and shoulder blade of a hog

Match Broadhead To Your Quarry

So, I will even change heads based on what animal I am hunting. For a smaller animals like a turkey or javelina, I use a very large cutting mechanical head, because that will cut a lot of tissue and still allow for a pass through. For a bigger animal like a wildebeest or elk, I like to use a smaller diameter cut to make sure I am getting deeper penetration.

I have also found that when it comes to blood trails, cutting diameter is more important than total cut. Allow me to explain with an example:

Diameter VS Total Cut

A four blade head with a one inch cutting diameter will have a “total cut” of two inches. Likewise, a two blade head with a two inch cutting diameter will also have a “total cut” of two inches. However, with all other things equal (penetration and shot placement) the two inch cutting diameter head will typically leave a better blood trail than the one inch cutting diameter head—even though the same amount of tissue is cut. The reason for this is that a smaller diameter cut is more likely to close up with tissue while the larger diameter cut is more likely to stretch and open up even more. I have seen this proven over and over again.

Another way to understand this principle is to “reduce it to the ridiculous.” Which broadhead would you rather pass through your body: An eight blade head with one inch cutting diameter or a two blade head with an eight inch cutting diameter? Both will cut the same amount of tissue, but I would much rather have a one inch hole go through my body than an eight inch cut go through my body. Well, so would a deer!

Keys: Greater Tissue Cut with Pass Through = Greater Blood Trail
Greater Diameter Cut with Pass Through = Even Greater Blood Trail

So before you read any further, keep in mind the fundamental goal in selecting a head: A broadhead should fly well, not break, holds its edge, penetrate deeply, and cut a lot of tissue. Strive to find that balance between cutting as much tissue as possible and still providing a good chance at a pass through.

Now let’s examine some of the most important features of broadhead design. The more you understand about each feature, the more effectively you can decide what works best for your set up and your budget.

Materials

There are three basic types of metals used in broadheads: aluminum, titanium, and steel. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. Aluminum and titanium are lighter than steel, which is why many heads tend to use them. It is easier for a head to make it to the 100gr weight if aluminum or titanium are used.

Aluminum

Aluminum is not as strong as steel. The best aluminums hardened in the best manner are still only as strong as the weaker steels. And, some aluminums are much weaker than others. The best aluminum for broadheads is 7075, which is quite a bit stronger than 6061. If you are going to consider using a head with aluminum, try to find one made of 7075. If the manufacturer doesn’t say which aluminum is being used, it is probably 6061. That doesn’t mean its “bad” but it does mean that it’s a bit “weaker.”

Titanium

Titanium is stronger than aluminum. As with aluminum, there are different grades of titanium. Just because a head is said to be made of titanium doesn’t mean it is using the top grade. Typically, if the manufacturer doesn’t state what grade it is, it is probably the weaker grade. While titanium is stronger than aluminum, it is not as strong as many steels. Both titanium and aluminum have less resistance to impact than many steels, so I prefer that a head that at least has a leading tip made of well hardened steel.

contact tip vs chisel tip broadheads post testing
Contact Tip vs Chisel Tip broadheads (post-testing)

Steel

There are many different varieties of steel and they are not all created equal. While steel tends to be stronger than titanium and aluminum, there are significant differences in the various types of steel. When it comes to broadheads, two of the most significant ratings of steel are Rockwell Hardness (the “hardness” of the steel) and Charpy V Notch Scoring (the steel’s resistance to impact).

A steel may be very hard with a high Rockwell Rating, but may be very brittle and break apart or chip easily upon impact with a hard medium. Likewise, a steel can have a lower Rockwell Rating and not break apart, but may bend too easily. Most steel broadheads use a 420 stainless steel, hardened to a level that is not too hard and not too soft. From my testing, it is obvious that some manufacturers are more successful at finding that balance than others.

There are also heads that are being made of tool steels and even very high end tool steels, such as 41L40, A2, and S7. With these premium steels, you will find a very high Rockwell hardness as well as a very high Charpy V Notch Score. Such heads will retain their structural integrity and razor edge far more effectively than typical stainless steels. They will cost a lot more money, but they are much more durable as well so they will last a long time.

Premium Tool Steels

In many of the tests I have done, I am continually impressed by how well premium tool steels keep their edge. While a typical stainless steel blade may become dull after cutting through 1/2” plywood, a head made of A2 or 41L40 or S7 will still be sticky sharp after cutting though that same board 5 times. That no doubt makes a difference in how well tissue, bones, and veins are cut. A duller head can often just bend veins over, but a head that is sharp all the way through an animal will effectively cut those veins, producing greater blood letting.

Within steel heads there are also different ways the steel can be formed. Some use MIM (Metal Injected Molding), some are welded together, and some are machined. The machined steels tend to be much stronger than the MIM steels and welded models.

Component Heads And Single Piece Heads

There are also a couple different types of construction of the broadheads themselves—component heads and single piece heads. Each has their advantages. Component heads can be made with very tight specifications, as each piece is easier to construct than an entire head. These high specs can enable them to fly extremely well. They are then held together with some sort of interlocking design and bolt. The best component heads do not use bolts that are load bearing, but rather that interlock, and then held in place by the bolts.

Single piece heads have the advantage of not being put together; they are literally one piece of steel. Thus, they tend to be more durable than component heads. But all single piece heads are not created equal. As mentioned earlier, if the head is machined out of a single block of steel it will tend to be much stronger than a head that is metal injected molded or welded.

Blade Thickness

All other things being equal, the thicker a blade is, the stronger it is. The thinner a blade is, the weaker it is. Thin blades may feel sharper out of the package, but they tend to lose that edge and bend or get nicked up more readily than thicker blades. I prefer blades that are at least .035” thick, but again, the thicker the better. When premium tool steels are used, a blade can still be relatively thin and still very strong.

Chisel Tips vs Cut on Contact Tips

Like most other broadhead topics, this one can lead to a pretty heated debate. In theory, chisel tips are more durable and cut on contact tips penetrate better. You can see this difference by pushing both a cut on contact head and a chisel tip head through a piece of cardboard. It will likely take noticeably less pressure for the cut on contact head to penetrate. However, upon impact with a hard medium like bone, the cut on contact tip is more likely to fold over than the chisel tip.

From my testing, I only prefer a cut on contact head if is either a very thick two blade head made out of premium tool steel or a three blade single piece head, where all three blades come together to form the tip. Otherwise, the cut on contact heads are too likely to fold over. There are some chisel tips that are extremely sharp on their edges, like those of the QAD Exodus, or Wasp Dart for example. Those tend to have penetration closer to a cut on contact head but the strength of a chisel tip.

Fixed Blade Broadheads

Many people prefer fixed blade heads over mechanical heads because they are more durable and dependable. There are no moving parts and fewer things to break. Fixed blade heads typically come in either two, three, or four blade models. Let’s briefly examine each of those:

Two Blade Heads

These are a throwback to the proven designs of Native Americans and other similar societies around the world. They are simple, durable, accurate, and penetrate well. Two blade heads can either come in Single Bevel or Double Bevel Designs.

fixed blade broadheads
Fixed blade broadheads typically come in 2, 3, and 4-blade varieties.
Single Bevel Heads

A single bevel blade simply means that the edge of a blade is only sharpened on one side. A double bevel blade means that the edge of the blade is sharpened on both sides. There are advantages to each design. Typically, the choice between a single bevel or double bevel edge only comes into play with two blade heads.

The advantage of a single bevel is that the angle of the blade creates a torsional force upon impacting a medium, causing it to rotate. If fletching is arranged helically, the arrow is already spinning. Then upon impact, a single bevel head will continue to spin inside an animal.

 This does a number of significant things. First, it creates a spiral wound channel. I typically find that the entrance hole of a single bevel head is not a slit, but rather a hole. The arrow is already spinning so much and is forced to spin more upon impact, creating a rounded entrance hole in the hide of an animal. The broadhead continues to cut tissue not only in the direction the head is pointing, but also in the direction the head is spinning—thus cutting both inwardly and spirally.

With internal organs, this can have a similar effect to spinning a fork when eating spaghetti, wrapping the noodles around the fork, then cutting them off. The twisting broadhead can twist the organs and then cut them as the head moves forward. I have seen this happen inside an animal many times and the devastation is undeniable.

Iron will broadheads through 16 gauge steel plate
Iron Will broadhead penetrating a 16 gauge steel plate

Second, a single bevel head typically breaches bone very effectively. As the tip of a head enters a bone, the head also twists and causes that bone to split apart and not just get cut. Then the arrow passes through that split in the bone. This is especially significant when hunting very large animals such as Cape Buffalo. If a broadhead cannot effectively breach that bone, penetration will suffer.

A third way the single bevel head works is that due to its twisting inside an animal, it is not likely for the arrow to back out of an animal if there is not a pass through (try pulling one out of a target and you will see what I mean). Often times, heads are sharpened on the back edges to allow the heads to continue to cut tissue in all directions inside of an animal.

Double Bevel Heads

Double bevel heads do not have this spiraling effect. However, they can often penetrate more deeply for two reasons: First, they can be sharpened to a finer edge. Secondly, they are only cutting tissue in a forward fashion and not a twisting fashion. They will not typically breach large bone as effectively as a single bevel, they will not create a spiral wound channel, and the arrow can back out of an animal more readily than a single bevel. But, they will penetrate hide and tissue more effectively.

As for which is better, it really does depend on your bow’s set up and your quarry. If you are generating lower kinetic energy and need penetration to be as deep as possible, a double bevel may be a better choice. If you have a bit more “normal” kinetic energy, or are hunting larger animals with heavier arrows, a single bevel will likely cause more damage to the animal.

From my testing, the only concern I have with two blade fixed heads is the size of the entry and exit holes. If an animal does not expire quickly, you are going to be forced to follow a blood trail. Smaller diameter cuts do not allow the degree of blood letting that larger cuts do. There may be plenty of damage inside the animal, but the blood trail may be compromised.

Recommended Single Bevel Heads: Bishop Archery (Bridgeport/Pipeline), Cutthroat Broadheads. Recommended Double Bevel Heads: German Kinetics Silver Flame, VPA, Steelforce

Three Blade Heads

There are some great strengths to using a three blade head, as evidenced by their popularity on the market. Three blade heads tend to make more of a “hole” than a slit. This makes the hole more difficult to close up and facilitates better blood letting. If the heads are a one piece construction with the correct angles, like VPAs or Bishops, you can easily sharpen two blades at a time by laying them flat on a stone and moving them back and forth, then rotating till all the blades are covered.

Recommended 3 Blade Heads: QAD Exodus, Bishop (Bridgeport/Pipeline) Holy Trinity, VPA, Muzzy Trocar

Four Blade Heads

Some heads use a four blade design. Most of those have two primary blades, followed by two smaller, “bleeder” blades. Others use four blades that are all the same size, such as Slick Tricks, Wac’ems or Wasps. From my testing, I have come to prefer a wider cut three blade head over a four blade head with smaller, equal sized blades. That fourth blade does cut more tissue, but it also impedes penetration more, and the hole is not as big as that of a wider cut three blade head.

A wider hole tends to produce a better blood trail than a smaller hole, whether it’s three blades or four. That being said, the four blade design of two larger blades and two bleeders is a very good option. They tend to be more forgiving in flight than a three blade head, all other things equal.

Whether you want a two leading blade cut on contact tip or a chisel tip is another question as well. See the earlier section discussing the pros and cons of these two designs.

Recommended 4 blade Heads: Iron Will, Trophy Taker A-TAC, Slick Trick Magnums, Magnus Black Hornet.

Mechanical Broadheads

Mechanical heads have come a long way in recent years. They have two primary advantages over fixed blade heads: Smaller surface area in flight (which allows them to be more forgiving in flight) and larger cut once the blades are deployed.

For example, even with a very well tuned bow, it would be quite difficult to shoot a fixed blade head with a two inch cutting diameter and have it fly well. But with a mechanical, you can get that two inch cutting diameter in a small, great flying package.

There are two primary styles of mechanical heads based on how the blades deploy upon impact.

Over the Top Deploying

The first mechanical heads to hit the market worked this way. The blades are on hinges and folds upward toward the tip of the head. They are either held in place by friction or a rubber band.

Upon impact, the blades peel back like a banana would, opening up to their full cutting diameter. They will not open fully until after they have entered the animal, thus the entrance holes are basically the same size as the head in the closed position.

Recommended Over the Top Deploying Mechanicals: Rocket Steelhead, NAP Spitfire, Wasp Jak-Knife, Dead Ringer Trauma, Grim Reaper

Rear Deploying

mechanical broadheads
mechanical broadheads (pre-testing)

In recent years, many heads have begun using various rear deploying mechanisms. With these heads, the blades swing open from the rear and are fully deployed by the time they reach the hide of an animal. Thus the entrance holes are the same size as the fully deployed blades.

Both of these mechanisms have their loyal followings and both can work well on animals. I have successfully taken many animals with both. However, there are some observations worth noting.

With over the top mechanicals, the entrance holes are small but the internal damage is great. They do tend to penetrate more deeply than rear deploying blades, simply because they cut less tissue upon entrance. If they pass all the way through the animal, the exit hole is the full size of the fully deployed blades. But if they do not pass all the way through, you have a small entrance hole and no exit hole. That spells a big problem for blood trails.

With rear deploying mechs, the entrance hole will be great; it will be the size of the fully deployed heads. But because of that, penetration can be compromised because it has to cut through the hide with that wide cut. However, you can be confident you are going to have at least one big hole. Between these two styles, after all my testing I prefer the rear deploying mechanical broadheads by a large margin.

Recommended Rear Deploying Mechs: Rage Hypodermic and Trypan, NAP Killzone, G5 Deadmeat

Hybrid Broadheads

Several different manufacturers have come out with hybrid heads, which are a combination of both a fixed blade and a mechanical head. There is typically a smaller two blade fixed head followed by a larger cut of mechanical blades.

I have taken a number of animals with these and tested them quite a bit. They certainly have their niche. The only downside is that you will want to make sure you have enough kinetic energy to drive all those blades deeply into an animal. Again, I prefer the rear deploying mechanical blades in a hybrid head. If they are over the top deploying, you will not get a very big entrance hole and an exit hole will be fairly difficult to achieve due to the large cut.

Recommended Hybrid Heads: Bloodsport Archery Gravedigger, Muzzy Hybrid Trocar HB-Ti.

Conclusion

Selecting a broadhead can be a pretty daunting task. And it gets extra confusing when all of your buddies each have their own strong opinions based on their personal experience from the last season. But you owe it to yourself and to the animal to make the most informed decision you can about which head is best for your purposes. Hopefully, this article will help you to make a bit more sense of the options and choices available.

Please check out my YouTube Channel as well, Lusk Archery Adventures, to see more than 20 different videos of broadhead tests and over 50 hunts with those heads as well. And don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions through the channel.

John Lusk archery goat

(Learn about N1 Outdoors archery apparel and other hunting and fishing apparel designs.)

BONUS: Thoughts On Broadheads From N1 Co-Founders

Online reviews can sometimes have an agenda of pushing a particular product. We thought it would be fun to give some straight talk from the N1 Outdoors co-founders on the broadheads they have used over the years.

Below, Josh Wells, Maston Boyd and Giles Canter give their thoughts on what they like and don’t like about some of the broadheads they have experience with during their archery hunts.

N1 Outdoors co-founder, Josh Wells

I started bowhunting in 1996. I was 16 years old and began bowhunting with the broadhead recommended by a friend. It was the Muzzy 3 blade in 100 grains…

Muzzy 3-blade, 100 grain

I harvested my first archery deer, in addition to several other deer with the Muzzy 3-blades. On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate this one at 7.

My experience with the Muzzy 3-blade is as follows:

Pros

The Muzzy 3-blade broadheads have a simple design. They are durable and easy to assemble, as well as affordable to buy. They also create decent blood trails.

Cons

In my experience, the Muzzy 3-blade broadheads have inconsistent and unstable arrow flight. By that, I mean that they fly differently than field points and requires advanced bow tuning skills.

Thunderhead 3-blade, 100 grain

After several years of using Muzzy 3-blade, I decided to change to something that was more consistent in flight. My choice was the Thunderhead 3-blade in 100 grains.

I harvested several deer with these, as well as my first turkey. On as scale of 1 to 10, I would rate these broadheads at 7.5.

My experience with the Thunderhead 3-blade is as follows:

They are very similar to the Muzzy 3-blade with the only real difference being that they are slightly more consistent and stable during flight.

Pros

These broadheads have a simple design and are affordable. They are durable, easy to assemble, and leave decent blood trails.

Cons

While the Thunderhead 3-blade broadheads have positive qualities similar to the Muzzy 3-blade, they also share some of the negatives as well. The negatives are inconsistent and unstable arrow flight. They do not fly like field points and require advanced tuning skills as well.

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Grim Reaper 3-blade, 100 grain

Sometime along the way, I decided to try mechanical broadheads, due to the reviews that I had been reading regarding massive blood trails, and arrow flight that was consistent with field points.

The broadhead that I chose was the Grim Reaper 3-blade in 100 grains with a 1-3/8” cutting diameter. This is the only mechanical broadhead that I’ve ever used.

I was pleased with the results that I got from these heads. But, I eventually made my way back to fixed blades due to a lack of confidence in the mechanical heads functioning properly 100% of the time. However, I harvested more than 10 deer with these broadheads over several hunting seasons.

On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate this head at 8.5. My experience with the Grim Reaper broadheads is as follows:

Pros

I found that the Grim Reaper broadheads had arrow flight consistent with field points. I also found them to be durable, with blades that were easily replaceable. As advertised, I experienced massive blood trails. They were one of the more affordable mechanical heads, with each package containing a practice point.

Cons

The Grim Reaper broadheads require attention to detail during assembly in order to make sure blades engage properly on impact. This can decrease hunters’ confidence in knowing that it’s possible that the blades won’t engage properly. (I will note that this never actually happened to me, but I’ve heard several other bow hunters say that it did in fact happen to them.

Magnus 2-blade, 100 grain

Eventually, I decided to go back to fixed blade broadheads. When I did my choice was influenced by the simple fact that shot placement is the most important factor in determining an archer’s successful recovery of an animal.

So, I was determined to find the most accurate broadhead available. I settled on the Magnus 2-blade in 100 grains.

I harvested more than 10 deer with these heads over several seasons. My major reason for changing away from this

broadhead was because of consistently poor blood trails.

On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate this head at 6. My experience with the Magnus 2-blade broadheads is as follows:

Pros

The Magnus 2-blade broadheads are super accurate, flying very similar to field points (although tuning is key in this area). They also had very good penetration, were easy to sharpen, and were the most affordable broadheads I’ve ever used.

Cons:

These heads were not very durable (the tips tended to bend easily). They also produced very bad blood trails (several deer I harvested left no blood trail at all).

Ramcat 3-blade, 100 grain

The next broadheads that I used were the Ramcat 3-blade in 100 grains. These heads were recommended by a friend that kills a lot of nice deer. I wasn’t crazy about the design of the blades (the screws loosen on impact for two-way cutting), but I decided to give them a shot.

I harvested three deer with these before I decided they weren’t for me. While they are very good broadheads from what I can tell, I couldn’t get past the blades loosening on impact (and sometimes in my quiver).

On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate these at 8. My experience with these heads is as follows:

Pros

They were very accurate, flying very similar to field points. They’re durable, with the blades possessing two-side cutting action. They are affordable and for fixed blade broadheads, produce decent blood trails.

Cons

The blades on these heads tend to loosen in the quiver.

Magnus Stinger Buzzcut

The last broadhead that I’ve used (which is the broadhead that I currently use and don’t plan on changing) is the Magnus Stinger Buzzcut in 100 grains.

I’ve used these broadheads now for about five seasons. I’ve harvested more than 10 deer with them.

I am equally satisfied with the Magnus Corporation’s customer service as I am with this broadhead. The Stinger Buzzcuts are on the high end of pricing for fixed blades, but the cost is offset by Magnus’ lifetime warranty, which I have firsthand experience with. I received a package of new heads this past season at no cost when they replaced heads that had either chips, or were slightly bent due to contact with bone.

magnus stinger buzzcut broadhead
Magnus Stinger Buzzcut Broadhead

On a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate this broadhead at 9. My experience is as follows:

Pros

These heads are super accurate, flying very similar to field points. They get very good penetration, are easy to sharpen, and produce good blood trails for a fixed blade broadhead.

Cons

So far, I have found none. The only reason that I didn’t give this broadhead a rating of 10 is because I haven’t used every broadhead out there, and couldn’t be certain that it’s the best one on the market. I just know it’s the best broadhead that I’ve ever used.

N1 Outdoors co-founder, Maston Boyd

I have tried several broadheads over the years and am always willing to try something new to compare with my experiences with other models.

Swhacker broadheads, 2-blade, 100 grain

I have found that Swhackers fly true. I have had many a bowhunt with great experiences and performance from these.

G5 Montec, 3-blade, 100 grain

In my opinion these are good, all-around broadheads for bowhunting. My only complaint would be that they don’t leave the biggest hole.

Magnus 2-blade, 100 grain

Like Josh, I too have used the Magnus 2-blade in 100 grain. I experienced good flight and feel that they are a good blade for pass-through shots. However, there is not always a lot of blood, which can obviously be problematic in tracking the animal.

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Muzzy 3-blade, 100 grain

I never got great flight patterns with the Muzzy 3-blade. Plain and simple.

Wasp 3-blade, 100 grain

I experienced the same problems of flight pattern with these that I did with the Muzzy 3-blade.

Thunderhead 3-blade, 125 grain

I experienced good flight as well as good performance on game with these broadheads.

Tshuttle 3-blade, 100 grain

Good flight and good blood. ‘Nuff said.

Rage 3-blade, 100 grain

The 3-blade Rage broadheads, in my experience, provided good flight. However, they were inconsistent on game and left me hoping that I didn’t hit bone.

Grim Reaper 3-blade, 100 grain

I only shot one deer with these. No pass through and no deer. Need I say more? Mechanical madness!

N1 Outdoors co-founder, Giles Canter

I killed my first archery deer in 2000. Over the years I have not been one to chase the latest, greatest, or most heavily advertised broadhead or archery equipment.

Simply put, I like to know what to expect in the field. When you’ve done the work to be sure your shooting process is accurate, the last thing you want is to shoot a new broadhead for the first time is when there is meat on the line.

I like to know the positives, as well as the limitations, of the broadheads and archery gear that I use, so that I know what to expect when the moment of truth comes. Because of this, I tend to stick with things for awhile unless I have a good reason to change. If it ain’t broke…

With that being said, I have used a handful of broadheads over the years and here are my thoughts…

Thunderhead 3-blade, 125 grain

These are near and dear to me since I took my first archery deer with a Thunderhead 3-blade. They give good flight and performance. A simple and solid broadhead, in my opinion.

Muzzy 3-blade, 100 grain

I used the Muzzy 3-blade for several seasons and killed many deer with them. But, I eventually set them aside because I didn’t feel like the groupings and arrow flight at all consistent with field points shot with the same setup. Call me picky, but I wasn’t crazy about the angled, overlapping blade assembly either.

Muzzy MX-3, 100 grain

I like the Muzzy MX-3 broadheads. They have pretty tough blades that can be sharpened or replaced. I have used the same blades for multiple kills on more than a few occasions. In my opinion these fly a little truer than the Muzzy 3-blade, but still don’t group great.

Grim Reaper 3-blade, 100 grain

I tried these heads (2-inch cut) for a couple hunting seasons at the recommendation of a friend whose initials are Josh Wells! While I killed several deer and experienced some devastatingly bloody trails with them, I also experienced some deflections as well. These left me feeling, well, grim!

I also once shot a turkey center-breast with the Grim Reaper that flew off with my arrow hanging out of it. This left me feeling grim again! I don’t like feeling grim, so I retired from using Grim Reapers.

G5 Striker

I started using the G5 Strikers by accident. My wife asked me what I wanted for Christmas. I am usually incapable of thinking of gift ideas that aren’t hunting related. So, I said, “how ’bout some Swhacker broadheads?”

When I opened my Christmas gifts that year, there was a brand new pack of… Striker broadheads! She said, “those are the right ones aren’t they?” I said, “well, I was looking for Swhackers, but these look great!”

I have actually thoroughly enjoyed using the G5 Strikers. They have proven to be very accurate for me and I have taken several deer with them. The only downside is that they don’t always leave the best blood trail.

Swhacker broadheads, 100 grain

Well, I did finally get my Swhackers (2-inch cut) that I referenced above! I have been as pleased with them as much as I have the Strikers. Arrow flight is great and pretty much like a field point. In my experience, they have left devastating wound channels and great blood trails.

The only thing I haven’t liked so far is that the blades can, especially with more than one use, begin to rattle somewhat during the draw. I am particular about being as silent as possible during a bow hunt. Because of this, I would view this as a negative. However, you have to buy new ones some time, I suppose!

Also be sure to check out our N1 whitetail deer hunting tips.

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The History Of Archery | A Look Into The Past

Have you ever watched those movies where they shoot arrows with a bow and wished that you could shoot them too?

Archery is indeed fascinating and remains one of the oldest arts still practiced today. In fact, archery is now one of the famous Olympic sports and is even a sport in the Summer Paralympic games.

So, just how did archery come about? And, when was is invented?

Archery was mainly used for hunting and warfare in the past, but is mainly a recreational activity now. If you have been longing to know more about archery, keep reading! We will cover the history of archery, archery equipment, famous historical archers and even how you can get started in the sport of archery.

History Of Archery

history of archery recurve arrow pic
Egyptians used bows and arrows, possibly as early as 5000 BC.

The evolution of archery dates back to the beginning of mankind’s history as studies have found evidence of ancient archers around the world.

Ancient Egyptians are known to have regularly used bows and arrows for hunting and warfare around 3000 BC.

Also, in China, archery has been traced back to the time of the Shang Dynasty in 1766-1027 BC, when a war chariot carried an archer, a lancer, a driver and a three-man team.

So, what exactly is archery?

According to Oxford Living Dictionaries, archery is the sport of shooting with a bow and arrows.

Merriam Webster defines it as the art, practice, or skill of shooting with a bow and arrow.

Someone who participates in archery is called an archer or a bowman. Anyone fond of archery or who is an expert at it is called a toxophilite.

Today, some still use archery for hunting wild game (known as bow hunting) and bow fishing has also grown in popularity. Archery is now rarely used for defense, except in leisure pursuits such as archery tag.

Who Invented The Bow And Arrow?

You might be wondering… who invented the bow and arrow and when were the bow and arrow invented? Well, we don’t know for sure who invented archery, but it’s believed that Egyptians may have used bows and arrows as early as 5000 BC.

When a skilled archer takes charge of a bow and arrow, the result can be effective and deadly. Thus, ancient bows and arrows out-classed other weapons, such as swords, that were available in the olden day. The ability to shoot an arrow from a distance gave archers an advantage in battle over those bearing swords.

History Of The Ancient Bow And Arrow

You can’t really talk about the history of archery without examining the history of the bow and arrow. In the ancient times, the major weapons were:

• The axe, sword and mace for short range
• The spear and javelin for medium range
• The bow and sling for long range

A Bow had two basic parts, including the string and the body, made of pliable and tough wood. The archer would the wooden part of the bow (grip) at the center when ready to shoot. When the simple bow was made, it had only one convex arc so it didn’t exploit the maximum pliability of the wood. So, the double-convex bow was invented to provide a greater range and tension.

The composite bow was later invented for warfare purposes, as it was made of four materials including wood, glue, animal sinews & tendons and sections of animal horn. The wooden part of the bow was made from different trees with different pliability and the back of the bow was covered with sinews bands. The belly of the bow was also reinforced with two sections of animal horn. The composite bow had a range of 300 to 400 yards.

Today there are many types of bows, including flatbows, longbows, cable-backed bows and compound bows.

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What About The Arrow?

Arrow fletchings help the arrows fly straight and smooth.

Arrows were also made of three parts, including the tail, body and the arrowhead. The tail was designed to ensure the arrow stayed on course in a straight and smooth flight, which was why it was made of feathers of sea-fowl, kite, vulture or eagles. These feathers, or “fletchings,” are now sometimes substituted as plastic “vanes.”

The body of the arrow was also hard, light, straight, long and thin to ensure maximum speed. The arrowhead was the hardest part, made of metal, flint or bone.

Arrowheads could be either triangular or leaf-shaped, flat or with central rib or spine. In ancient times, the form of an arrowhead was based on the nature of the armour of the enemy that needed to be penetrated. Today, arrows are made of fiberglass, composite materials, aluminum, wood and bamboo.

The Oldest Bow Ever Found

So how old is the oldest bow?

The oldest bows were found in Holmegard swamp in Denmark. Some date the series of bows found in the bog between 20,000-9,500 BC. The municipality called Holmegard is no longer in existence as of 2007, because it has been merged with other municipalities to form the Naestved municipality.

The first bows ever used were made of wood and stone or wooden arrowheads. In 3300 BC, the arrowhead was changed to bronze which could be shaped and sharpened with ease.

Development And Evolution Of Archery

Chinese introduced archery to Japan in the 6th century and it had a great influence on later techniques and etiquette. One of the Japanese martial arts was originally known as kyujutsu, meaning the “art of the bow.” But, now it’s called kyudo, which means ‘the way of the bow.”

Presently, modern kyudo is mainly practiced as the method of moral, physical and spiritual development. With kyudo, the archer has to perform a certain ritual movement before moving to the shooting line and shoots from a distance of 28 meters. During Greco-Roman times, the bow was mainly used for hunting or personal exploits, rather than for warfare.

The superiority of Middle East technique and equipment continued for centuries. In 1200 BC, the iron age paved way for arrowheads to be made from iron, which allows for a deadlier shot and better armour penetration.

Archery was used for hunting, but Koreans, Indians, Parthians, Persians, Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians, Japanese and Chinese used it in their armies.

The English longbow was made from yew wood in 1337 and used during the Hundred Years War because of its ability to outreach the enemy bows. Although the English longbows were effective, the Turkish and Asian bows were more efficient and far better than an English yew bow.

Later, firearms were developed and rendered bows obsolete, causing the use of bow to decline until the 18th century, when archery was revived as a sport. Since that time, there have been several big tournaments.

In the 1900 Paris Olympics, archery was included. Professional engineers started developing new types of bows in the 1920’s, including the modern compound bow and recurve, which are currently the most popular forms of the bow in the Western hemisphere.

History Of Archery In North America
history of archery native american

Although bows and arrows were already in existence when Central Asian peoples crossed over to North America, the people didn’t seem to know about them. It’s believed that Native Americans did not begin the practice of archery until about 500 AD.

It’s believed that once they discovered the bow and arrow, that it became the preferred weapon of choice, because it took less raw materials to make than spears.

Indian tribes, such as the Cherokee Indians, used the bow and arrow to hunt for animals. They would bowhunt for fox , turkey, rabbits, elk, bear and deer. Deer were especially useful, as they provided materials for clothing and tents, as well as for food.

Indians used deer antlers to make weapons like spears, arrow heads, fish hooks, needles and other useful tools.

Archery In Mythology

If you’ve watched Chinese, Korean and Japanese movies, you will understand how popular archery is. Robin Hood is another modern movie where archery was made popular. And if you’ve read Odysseus in Book 21 of the Odyssey, where Odysseus was mentioned as being skilled in archery, you will see that the history of archery is a rich one.

Due to the use of the bow and arrow for warfare and survival, many heroes and gods are still depicted as using bows and arrows. Some of these mythological figures and folk heroes include:

• Abhimanyu
• Kama (son of Radha)
• Cupid
• Artemis and Apollo
• Hayk and Marduk
• Heracles
• Shiva
• Rama
• Arjune
• Robin Hood
• Wilhelm Tell (William Tell)

How was archery developed into a sport?

During the time of King Henry VIII, archery was developed into a sport in England. At that time, men younger than sixty were asked to practice shooting with arrow and bow. From that time, people started competing with one another during festivals.

In 1900, archery was included in the Olympic Games and was among the first sports in which women were allowed to participate.

During the 1920 Olympics, archery was included, but afterward dropped because of lack of consistent international rules and lack of interest.

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When people again started showing interest in archery in 1931, an international governing body called the Federation of International Target Archery (FITA) was formed to establish rules accepted around the world. But, that did not convince Olympic organizers to include archery again in the Olympic program until the 1972 Olympic Games in Germany.

When the archery was added again to the Olympic Games, each archer was asked to use bows made of wood and covered in graphite. Their arrowheads were made of aluminum, with strings made of Kevlar or hydrocarbon.

Athletes were asked to use protective equipment like shooting gloves and arm guards to protect their forearms and hands.

Modern Day Archery

Unlike in the olden days when archery was mainly used for defense and war, modern day archery is practiced in different forms with different types of bows.

We now have disciplined martial artists, recreational archers, world championships, record-breaking distance attempts and Olympic level competitions. Although people still use archery for hunting game and for bow fishing, it is rarely used for war and defense. Everything about archery in the modern setting is leisure pursuit and anybody can learn archery and become an archer.

>> Check out some of our N1 Outdoors brand archery and bowhunting videos which include aiming tips and bow maintenance. <<

Protective Equipment

history of archery arm guard
A “bracer” is an arm guard to protect the inside of the arm when shooting a bow.

Most archers wear an arm-guard, called a bracer, to protect the inside of the arm that holds the bow. It’s not that the bracer braces the arm; the word was formed from “brassard”, which means an armoured badge or sleeve. Some archers (females especially) wear plastrons or chest guards on their chest for protection.

Fascinating Facts About Archery

Archery has come a long way and since it is now mainly used for the recreational purpose, here are some interesting facts about archery:

1. Archery is one of the safest sports

Archery is considered to be one of the oldest sports in the world. With just one injury out of 2,000 participants, the National Safety Council has deemed archery as three times safer than golf. In fact, USA Archery claims the sport is safer than bowling. This means archery is fun and safe for everyone and you can try it too!

2. Archery is the national sport of the Kingdom of Bhutan

The Kingdom of Bhutan has made archery their national sport. Almost every village has an archery range. That is how popular archery is in the Kingdom of Bhutan.

3. An archer is also called toxophilite

Although the word sounds funny, it is legitimate. The word “Toxophilite” originates from Greek “toxon” meaning bow and arrow and Greek “philos” meaning loving. So you are also a toxophilite if you are an archer!

4. King Henry V was a toxophilite

In 1421, King Henry V of England ordered 500,000 arrows for his army and the arrows were kept in the Tower of London where the king’s arrow keeper watched over it.

5. Archery was the first Olympic game that allowed women to compete

In the past, women are not allowed to participate in the Olympic Games but archery changed that. Archery allowed female competitors in the Olympic Games in 1904. Now, you can’t talk about the Olympic Games without mentioning female archers like Khatuna Lorig and Mackenzie Brown.

6. Monarchs in Britain have banned golf, bowls and football for archery

In Britain, various monarchs have banned golf, bowls and football because men refused to practice archery because of these sports. In fact, during King Henry VIII’s reign, he ordered every man in the country to practice archery after church on Sundays! So, England was the first country to organize archery competitions in the 1500s.

7. Archery has been featured in many movies

If you have watched movies like The Lord of the Rings, Robin Hood, Rambo, The Hunger Games, Brave and some of the Korean and Japanese movies, you would understand why a many people around the world want to become archers.

How archery can benefit you

You may be asking; is archery really that important? Does it offer any benefit? Well, archery offers both physical and mental benefits. It doesn’t offer these benefits to only adults; children can learn al lot from archery as well.

1. Exercise

The act of drawing a bow is an exercise and can help you burn calories, as well as build up certain muscle groups. So, if you are looking to stay fit, archery can be a good form of exercise.

2. Upper body strength

When you draw the bowstring, your shoulder, arms, hands, back and chest are involved. So drawing a bow can help you stabilize your leg muscles and core muscles for balance.

3. Confidence

When you are successful in a competitive archery, you can gain self-esteem and confidence. Winning a competition and boosting your confidence can help you in other aspects of your life.

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4. Relaxation

Merely seeing your arrow fly and hit the target can give you a relaxing and satisfying experience.

5. Hand-eye coordination

With archery, you can gain hand-eye coordination. When you practice standing correctly, nocking an arrow, drawing your bow, setting up your shot and releasing the arrow, you are sure to gain hand-eye coordination. If you are consistent in practicing archery, you will increase your coordination.

6. Focus

To achieve a good shot, you need to be precise, account for variables including power, distance and wind. Because you are required to be focused when shooting an arrow, it can also help your focus in other aspects of your life.

7. It is a cool sport

Archers are usually portrayed by Hollywood as heroes because that is how people view old and modern legends like Robin Hood and Katniss Everdeen. Archery is also considered one of the safest, if not the safest sport in the world.

8. Friendship

Archery is a great pastime to take part in with friends. Whether you are target shooting or hunting with a bow, archery gives you a chance to connect to like-minded individuals.

9. Patience

Being successful at archery requires patience and dedication. So, if you are looking for a lesson in patience, this is the right sport for you!

10. It is open to all

Whether you are able-bodied or disabled, this sport can be taken part in by anyone. Even the blind can use special equipment to enjoy this sport. Archery is for everyone, whether young, old, male or female.

How to get started in archery

Maybe you’ve seen others shooting a bow and arrow, or you’ve watched movies that feature archery and now you’re wondering how you too can get started. It is easy. Whether you want to shoot arrows for fun, or learn to become an archery competitor, there is a place for you in the sport of archery.

Archery at its core is fun, addictive and challenging. And, with the many benefits it offers, you are sure to love it. The most important disciplines you need in archery are field, target and 3D. You can easily find an organization that offers classes in each of the disciplines. And who knows, with practice and dedication, you might even be offered a chance to compete in competitions including national and international competitions!

After figuring out the aspect of archery you like, you need to consider the type of bow you would like to use.

The best bows for beginners

history of archery kid archer
Archery is a great sport for youth, but there are several factors to consider when choosing a starter bow package.

As a beginner in the sport of archery, choosing the right bow can be a difficult task but don’t worry, here are what define a beginner bow:

• Low maintenance
• Smooth drawing
• Affordable
• Easily adjustable
• Available in a ready to shoot package

You can start today

If you’d really love to become an archer or bowhunter, you can start today! N1 Outdoors was founded by three friends that love the sport of bowhunting, so archery is near and dear to our hearts!

We love providing archery tips, helpful information on bow hunting topics, such as good broadhead selection, and apparel that reflects our love of archery

old tower deer stand

Types of deer hunting tree stands

The view from the top of a mountain is often worth the climb. But can the same be said about deer hunting tree stands?

If you love hunting whitetail deer, it’s worth the time to find out before you spend your hard-earned money on a new one.

So, we’ve compiled a list of the different types of deer hunting tree stands and the pros and cons of each. We hope this will help you make the right decision on which tree stand to use on your next whitetail hunt.

Before you spend your money, learn about the various types of deer stands below…

Ladder stands

Many whitetail hunters prefer ladder stands when they want entry into their hunting location to be as quiet as possible. When set up ahead of time, ladder stands allow a hunter to walk quietly to their location without running the risk of metal clanging or of a sweaty setup that could leave unwanted scent on the ground and in the air.

Quiet Entry

Some hunters believe that when compared to climbing tree stands, ladder stands allow for not only a quiet entry into the woods, but a quieter climb.

Because the stand is already set up prior to the hunt, access can be made without worrying about about assembly. (No loud scraping or searching for pieces and parts of multi-part climbing or lock-on stands.)

Steady And Roomy

ladder stand pic
Ladder stands with shooting rails can be extremely useful for rifle hunters.

Some deer hunters also prefer ladder stands because they don’t feel as safe in climbing stands or fixed position stands like lock-ons. Or, they may simply be physically unable to use climbers or lock-ons.

Ladder stands tend to have large seats and side rails. If set up properly, they are typically secured well to a tree and very sturdy. Many come with the option of a shooting rail, which is a plus for rifle hunters. Ladder stands can also be used for bow hunting if shooting rail is removed.

There are also “buddy” type ladder stands which allow for more than one person to sit in the stand. This feature can be very useful for when you are teaching a child to hunt or hunting with a significant other.

Ladder Stands… Is The Setup Worth It?

Some hunters don’t like to use ladder stands for deer hunting because they can be cumbersome to set up and can be easy to spot if not concealed well. If you have any problems on your hunting land with theft, you might not want to go with a ladder stand. While they can require some sweat to take down and haul out of the woods, a hard-working thief might be up for the challenge.

Ladder stands can also require a “cleaner” tree for setup, as opposed to lock-on tree stands, which can set up without having to cut as many limbs. Some hunters prefer lock-on or hang-on tree stands, as opposed to ladder stands, because ladder stands are typically 20 ft or shorter.

Ladder Stand Manufacturers

Some ladder stand manufacturers include, Millenium Treestands, Muddy Outdoors, Rivers Edge, Big Game, Hawk Treestands, X-Stand and API.

Ladder stand Pros:

  • No setup during hunt
  • Quiet entry and climb
  • Can be used for rifle hunting or bow hunting
  • Some ladder stands accomodate multiple hunters
  • Less taxing physically to climb

Ladder stand Cons:

  • Setup can be cumbersome
  • Tree type can affect setup
  • Theft possible
  • Difficult to conceal
  • Limited stand height

Not wanting a ladder stand… how about “fixed position” tree stands?

Fixed Position Tree Stands

Fixed position tree stands include lock-on tree stands, sometimes referred to as hang-on tree stands. Lock-on tree stands are very useful when you know the exact location of where you want to have a stand. For example, you may be hunting the edge of a food plot or attractant location that you know is traditionally well-traveled. Or you may  want to have multiple stand locations set up, so you can hunt a particular stand based on current wind direction or deer movement.

Quiet, Light And Incognito

Lock on tree stands (or hang-on stands) are typically able to be set up quickly. With the use of screw-in steps or stick ladders, they also are not as visibly disruptive to the hunting location as ladder stands can be.

lock on tree stand
Lock-on stands are ideal for bow hunters, but if you feel the need to have a lot of standing room, you will want to choose a stand with a larger platform.

While it’s not necessarily recommended to leave lock-on tree stands up year-round, they can be left up for the full season, allowing for quiet entry without disruptive noises that some climbing stands can produce. They also allow for a higher platform height than most ladder stands.

Lock-on stands tend to be much lighter weight than ladder stands, allowing for portability, easier pack and travel, and quick setup. Because screw-in steps and stick ladders can be used with hang-on stands, they also do not usually require as much limb trimming for that portion of the stand to be set up.

While lock-on stands tend to be conducive to bow hunters, without the use of a shooting rail, these types of tree stands can be difficult for a rifle hunter. And, while most don’t have side rails and other movement restrictions, that can leave some hunters feeling unsafe in the tree. (It is important to always use a safety harness when climbing up and down any treestand.)

Unless the hang-on stand you choose specifically has a large platform, limited foot space can be a concern for some hunters. So, if you like to have a lot of room to move around when standing, you should choose a stand with a larger foot platform.

Like ladder stands, lock-on stands can be the target of thieves. There are locking mechanisms available to serve as a deterrent, but a thief who is bent on stealing could still walk off with your lock-on stand due to its portability.

Lock-On / Hang-On Stand Manufacturers

Some notable lock-on tree stand manufacturers include, Lone Wolf, Millenium Treestands, Muddy Outdoors, and X-stand Treestands.

Lock-On Stand Pros:

  • No setup during the hunt
  • Lightweight
  • Compact and portable for packing and travel
  • Quiet entry and climb
  • Allows for better concealment
  • Great for bowhunters

Lock-On Stand Cons:

  • Can feel less safe
  • Theft possible
  • Some lock-ons have smaller foot platforms
  • Some not conducive to rifle hunting

Still looking for your ideal tree stand? Read about climbing stands below…

Climbing Stands

Some hunters consider climbing tree stands (climbers) to be the most difficult to use. However, with proper practice and safety precautions, climbing stands provide hunters with some advantages in certain hunting scenarios.

Climbing stands can be very useful when you are hunting land that you may not be very familiar with. Climbers give a hunter the ability to search for a hunting location that is has favorable wind and also provides the ability to climb to a higher point without the height limitations of ladder stands, for example.

climbing tree stands pic
Climbing stands are great for portable hunting, but require the tree you are wanting to hunt from to be free of limbs that would restrict climbing.

Climbing stands typically allow for easy setup and removal, meaning that you can enter the woods with your stand and leave with it at the end of the hunt. This prevents theft and also allows a hunter to be truly mobile and not be limited to predetermined deer stand locations.

Climbing stands can also pose some challenges in certain hunting situations. Unlike lock-on stands, climbers need trees with either no protruding limbs, or few enough so that they can be trimmed on the way up the tree.

Climbers also work best when the tree being climbed does not have a large discrepancy in diameter from the bottom of the tree to the height at which the stand will be secured for hunting. If the diameter changes drastically from bottom to top, the hunter may have to begin the climb with the foot platform at an uneven, and even steep angle. This can make climbing not only difficult, but dangerous as well. A properly fastened safety harness should always be used during climbing and at all times when in the deer stand.

To Cover Or Not To Cover…

When it comes to cover, climbers provide both an advantage and a disadvantage, depending on the hunting location.

For example, you might have plenty of trees on a piece of property that allow for easy climbing.  However, if there are no other trees near the tree you want to climb to provide some cover for you while in the tree stand, you could find yourself sticking out like a sore thumb. And, contrary to what some believe, deer can and do look up at times, especially if they hear or smell something suspicious. It’s a good idea to climb near cover, so if that buck of a lifetime comes, you are not left wishing you had stayed hidden.

Up, Up And Away…

Climbing stands can also be much more physically taxing than ladder stands or lock-on stands. And, the effort exerted can produce one of the most unwanted by-products during a whitetail hunt… sweat. A sweaty hunter is a smelly hunter. For this reason, some hunter choose other types of tree stands instead of a climber.

Because climbing stands have to be unpacked and attached to a tree, some hunters feel that the risk of metal clanging, and other unwanted noises, isn’t worth the mobility advantages they can provide. Once attached to the tree, climbing stands also will generate noise during a hunter’s  climb up the tree.

Climbing Stand Manufacturers

Some notable manufacturers of climbing stands include,  Summit Treestands, Lone Wolf, Muddy Outdoors, API and Ol’Man.

Climbing Stand Pros:

  • Mobility
  • Easily removable to prevent theft
  • Climbers allow for adjustable hunting height

Climbing Stand Cons:

  • Climbable trees needed
  • Potential for noise / sweat
  • Limited cover
  • Physically taxing

If you are trying to determine which of these types of deer stands might be right for you, we hope you have found this post useful. Best of luck on your next hunt and please practice safe hunting and climbing!

If you want to read another type of hunting “stand,” check our our article on permanent hunting blinds.

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